Let's make for better wifi!

$12,108 of $20k goal

Raised by 136 people in 18 months
Dave Farber, Vint Cerf, Jim Gettys, Linus Torvalds, Jon Corbett, Eric Raymond, Dave Reed, Sascha Meinrath, Bruce Schneir, Bob Frankston, Harald Alvestrand, James Woodyatt,  Dan Geer, Nick Feamster, Paul Vixie, Phil Karn, Ted Lemon, Steven M. Bellovin, Vishal Misra,
Henning Rogge, Keith Winstein, Corinna "Elektra" Aichele, Chengchen Hu, Jeff Osborn, Christopher Waid, Lauren Weinstein, myself (Dave Täht), AND 260+ other famous Internet engineers and scientists have put out a call for a saner approach to managing the worldwide problems in home routers and Wifi along the edge of the Internet and in the Internet of Things.

We have put out a new plan for getting vendors to better manage our often hopelessly buggy, insecure, unmaintained, and out of date device firmware in front of government and the FCC.

We need to continue getting the issues in front of more people - and to be able to keep working on making Wifi better! 

Our press release is here: http://businesswire.com/news/home/20151014005564/en/Global-Internet-Experts-Reveal-Plan-Secure-Reliable

Our letter to the FCC: http://fqcodel.bufferbloat.net/~d/fcc_saner_software_practices.pdf
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Update 10
Posted by Dave Täht
5 months ago
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An article about about the state of the make-wifi-fast work - now entering both lede/openwrt and the linux mainline was published in lwn. We won big with swapping out the ath9k's wifi code for something fq_codel enabled, and are showing orders of magnitude improved latency under load at most rates.

https://lwn.net/Articles/705884/

Thx for all your support!
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Update 9
Posted by Dave Täht
10 months ago
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There has been some serious progress on making wifi faster of late. The first set of patches adding fq_codel to the mac layer of wifi, were wonderful, and I analyzed at: http://blog.cerowrt.org/post/fq_codel_on_ath10k/

Other patches are now flying in loose formation (notably ath9k support of the above and "airtime fairness") - most of the work is documented on the "make-wifi-fast" mailing list.

I am blogging the results as we go along at: http://blog.cerowrt.org/tags/wifi/

But at the moment I have a simpler problem, in that I'd like all of the underlying OS to be stabler, and to do that I started up another, campaign here, to try and cover the costs of keeping my bit of the lede-project build system going:

https://www.gofundme.com/2awkswc

Which has a bit of a less "fuzzy" and more measurable goal than all the research and integration work and fighting with regulators and vendors than this campaign has.
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Update 8
Posted by Dave Täht
13 months ago
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Well, http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2016/03/tp-link-blocks-open-source-router-firmware-to-comply-with-new-fcc-rule/ reports that tp-link is falling over itself to wreck it's updatability by normal people, and saying it's the FCC to blame.

There has been about 650 dollars contributed here over the last month. I just matched that and sent it over to

https://www.gofundme.com/save_wifi_round_2

As a world without wifi routers that can be improved is one I can't work in. Thank you all for your support.
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Update 7
Posted by Dave Täht
14 months ago
   Share
My campaign was focused originally on raising money to cover the costs of fighting the FCC - *and* to recoup some of my costs in running that campaign - *and* - to suggest saner means for all of the Internet of things to be better, more secure, and regularly updated - *and* to get to where I could, personally - focus on adapting bufferbloat fighting techniques to make wifi faster on wifi cards anyone could have.

This split in foci for me and those that have helped made the donation situation fuzzy. As the latest news is (see below), that basically most of the next generation of wifi devices will have unmodifiable firmware due to the FCC rulings - a more focused campaign, aimed at just that, seems saner.

If you care about having wifi that you own, and control, about having verifyable sources, about having open devices - please donate to the below link - to take the battle back to the FCC!

https://www.gofundme.com/save_wifi_round_2

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Read a Previous Update
Dave Täht
18 months ago
1
1

"We are entering an era where an array of interconnected devices will create 'lowest common denominator security' within the most private reaches of our homes. True cybersecurity results from open code, peer review, and user control over their own devices and data; our recommended solutions are fundamentally important to the future growth of the Internet of Things economy.” -- Sascha Meinrath, Palmer Chair in Telecommunications at Penn State University

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago
1
1

“The Internet of Things shouldn't be the Internet of Vulnerable Unpatchable Abandoned-by-Manufacturer Things.” -- Will Edwards

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago
1
1

“"Software by its very nature has bugs and will be vulnerable to attack. The only way we can be confident that such a critical piece of our societal infrastructure is as safe as possible is if the source code is made fully available for review and can be fixed by anyone with authority when problems arise. This alternate proposal, which is grounded in a deep understanding of how security issues really play out in this context, should be seriously considered by the FCC." -- Karen M. Sandler, Executive Director, Software Freedom Conservancy

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“Wi-Fi devices aren’t just radios: they are network devices. The software that governs them impacts the security and reliability of the whole network. If we leave firmware solely in the hands of manufacturers, we close the door to the very independent research that has been advancing the state of Internet technology and security all along.” -- Susan E. Sons, Director, Internet Civil Engineering Institute

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"The security implications should be obvious to anyone who's been paying attention to recent headlines. Less obvious is all the research and other work that goes on behind the scenes, by the very people who made the Internet what it is today. Losing the ability to control the software that runs on these devices would bring this kind of research to a halt, and tie the hands of many brilliant minds who have dedicated their lives and careers to the continued improvement of the network we all depend on. If we want to build the fast, secure, reliable Internet of the future, this kind of research must be allowed to continue." -- Jeff Loughlin, Independent Researcher and Open Source Developer

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"Leveraging off-the-shelf WiFi hardware plays an important role in academic research in the field. Locked down devices would both independent verification of vendor performance claims and research into improving performance of current and future generation WiFi." -- Toke Høiland-Jørgensen, Bufferbloat researcher at Karlstad University, Sweden

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“Dyn provides performance solutions for a significant proportion of the world's most popular web properties, and invests significant resources in maintaining the availability of our global DNS platform in the face of near constant attack. Low-cost (near zero-margin) home and small-business routers, easily compromised, are a significant contributor to attack traffic that we mitigate every day. In the race to the bottom, these devices are effectively unsupported by those who sell them; the ability to harden such devices is essential to the future success of the Internet as a reliable platform for communication and commerce.” -- Joe Abley, Director of Architecture, Dyn

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“Software upgradeability and inspection is vitally important, and should not be impaired. It is unimaginable that the FCC would propose anything to impede updates to network elements, and I hope that the words in the petition are considered carefully and used as a template for sane (and light) legislation.” -- John Todd, Senior Technologist at Packet Clearing House

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“As the editor of the IETF standards document RFC 7368 “IPv6 Home Networking Architecture Principles”, which describes how future IPv6 home networks can be built, I fully support the Letter submitted to the FCC,. The IETF works on the principle of rough consensus and running code, and the ability to modify and update open source home router images enables innovation and the future advancement of the Internet” -- Dr Tim Chown, Lecturer, University of Southampton (UK).

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“While looking at regulation, it would be more useful to consider ensuring vendors adopt IPv6 as they have ignored it for the last 10+ years requiring a complete device replacement. FOSS has enabled many of their devices to be updated rather than dumped in landfill.” -- Brandon Butterworth, Chief Scientist, British Broadcasting Corporation

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"Unlike global climate change, software is a human construct, conceived by engineers. The use and management of it is therefore modifiable to be optimized for future use by qualified people with predictable positive results for security. As such, these issues deserve to have sufficient technical resources and intelligent legal framework to make this happen." -- Randy Resnick, Creator, IP Communications & VoIP Community and VoIP Users Conference

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"I was one of the designers of the Minstrel rate control algorithm that is now used for many, many Wi-Fi devices. Minstrel approximately doubled the range and gave a 10x improvement in throughput for Wi-Fi devices of the time, at the same time as decreasing their time-average radiated power. That research would have been prohibited or greatly impeded by the proposed rulemaking. It was done outside of the FCC jurisdiction, in New Zealand, but other countries tend to follow the FCC rule structure, and technical measures to implement the proposed FCC rules would be a serious impediment to doing that sort of work irrespective of the legal aspects. Further, this rule would set a precedent that would inevitably be applied in other areas of technology, and this would cause a great deal of harm to research and innovation. Locked-down firmware on Internet-connected devices stands to become a very serious problem for society, and should not be encouraged in any way. I strongly agree with the proposed alternate path for that reason.” -- Andrew McGregor: Linux WiFi developer (Minstrel rate control), IETF working group chair, AQM developer and SDN researcher

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“With the Internet of Things upon us, regulators can play a vital role in making our hardware secure. By requiring industry-leading engineering practices like we’ve described in this comment, the FCC can ensure Americans have more secure devices which respect the radio spectrum. At the same time, these practices provide makers and inventors with the flexibility necessary for world-leading innovation.” - Eric Schultz

+ Read More

$12,108 of $20k goal

Raised by 136 people in 18 months
Created October 19, 2015
ST
$5
Susanna Turunen
12 months ago

Good work.

$10
Anonymous
12 months ago
DB
$50
David Buttrick
13 months ago
$20
Anonymous
13 months ago
$5
Anonymous
13 months ago
$50
Anonymous
13 months ago
MD
$10
Manuel Dipolt
14 months ago

It should be a human right to be able to run your OWN software on your OWN router!

$10
Roland Lehmann
14 months ago
$20
Stephan Korb
14 months ago
GP
$5
Gabor Pinter
14 months ago
Dave Täht
18 months ago
1
1

"We are entering an era where an array of interconnected devices will create 'lowest common denominator security' within the most private reaches of our homes. True cybersecurity results from open code, peer review, and user control over their own devices and data; our recommended solutions are fundamentally important to the future growth of the Internet of Things economy.” -- Sascha Meinrath, Palmer Chair in Telecommunications at Penn State University

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago
1
1

“The Internet of Things shouldn't be the Internet of Vulnerable Unpatchable Abandoned-by-Manufacturer Things.” -- Will Edwards

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago
1
1

“"Software by its very nature has bugs and will be vulnerable to attack. The only way we can be confident that such a critical piece of our societal infrastructure is as safe as possible is if the source code is made fully available for review and can be fixed by anyone with authority when problems arise. This alternate proposal, which is grounded in a deep understanding of how security issues really play out in this context, should be seriously considered by the FCC." -- Karen M. Sandler, Executive Director, Software Freedom Conservancy

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“Wi-Fi devices aren’t just radios: they are network devices. The software that governs them impacts the security and reliability of the whole network. If we leave firmware solely in the hands of manufacturers, we close the door to the very independent research that has been advancing the state of Internet technology and security all along.” -- Susan E. Sons, Director, Internet Civil Engineering Institute

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"The security implications should be obvious to anyone who's been paying attention to recent headlines. Less obvious is all the research and other work that goes on behind the scenes, by the very people who made the Internet what it is today. Losing the ability to control the software that runs on these devices would bring this kind of research to a halt, and tie the hands of many brilliant minds who have dedicated their lives and careers to the continued improvement of the network we all depend on. If we want to build the fast, secure, reliable Internet of the future, this kind of research must be allowed to continue." -- Jeff Loughlin, Independent Researcher and Open Source Developer

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"Leveraging off-the-shelf WiFi hardware plays an important role in academic research in the field. Locked down devices would both independent verification of vendor performance claims and research into improving performance of current and future generation WiFi." -- Toke Høiland-Jørgensen, Bufferbloat researcher at Karlstad University, Sweden

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“Dyn provides performance solutions for a significant proportion of the world's most popular web properties, and invests significant resources in maintaining the availability of our global DNS platform in the face of near constant attack. Low-cost (near zero-margin) home and small-business routers, easily compromised, are a significant contributor to attack traffic that we mitigate every day. In the race to the bottom, these devices are effectively unsupported by those who sell them; the ability to harden such devices is essential to the future success of the Internet as a reliable platform for communication and commerce.” -- Joe Abley, Director of Architecture, Dyn

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“Software upgradeability and inspection is vitally important, and should not be impaired. It is unimaginable that the FCC would propose anything to impede updates to network elements, and I hope that the words in the petition are considered carefully and used as a template for sane (and light) legislation.” -- John Todd, Senior Technologist at Packet Clearing House

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“As the editor of the IETF standards document RFC 7368 “IPv6 Home Networking Architecture Principles”, which describes how future IPv6 home networks can be built, I fully support the Letter submitted to the FCC,. The IETF works on the principle of rough consensus and running code, and the ability to modify and update open source home router images enables innovation and the future advancement of the Internet” -- Dr Tim Chown, Lecturer, University of Southampton (UK).

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“While looking at regulation, it would be more useful to consider ensuring vendors adopt IPv6 as they have ignored it for the last 10+ years requiring a complete device replacement. FOSS has enabled many of their devices to be updated rather than dumped in landfill.” -- Brandon Butterworth, Chief Scientist, British Broadcasting Corporation

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"Unlike global climate change, software is a human construct, conceived by engineers. The use and management of it is therefore modifiable to be optimized for future use by qualified people with predictable positive results for security. As such, these issues deserve to have sufficient technical resources and intelligent legal framework to make this happen." -- Randy Resnick, Creator, IP Communications & VoIP Community and VoIP Users Conference

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

"I was one of the designers of the Minstrel rate control algorithm that is now used for many, many Wi-Fi devices. Minstrel approximately doubled the range and gave a 10x improvement in throughput for Wi-Fi devices of the time, at the same time as decreasing their time-average radiated power. That research would have been prohibited or greatly impeded by the proposed rulemaking. It was done outside of the FCC jurisdiction, in New Zealand, but other countries tend to follow the FCC rule structure, and technical measures to implement the proposed FCC rules would be a serious impediment to doing that sort of work irrespective of the legal aspects. Further, this rule would set a precedent that would inevitably be applied in other areas of technology, and this would cause a great deal of harm to research and innovation. Locked-down firmware on Internet-connected devices stands to become a very serious problem for society, and should not be encouraged in any way. I strongly agree with the proposed alternate path for that reason.” -- Andrew McGregor: Linux WiFi developer (Minstrel rate control), IETF working group chair, AQM developer and SDN researcher

+ Read More
Dave Täht
18 months ago

“With the Internet of Things upon us, regulators can play a vital role in making our hardware secure. By requiring industry-leading engineering practices like we’ve described in this comment, the FCC can ensure Americans have more secure devices which respect the radio spectrum. At the same time, these practices provide makers and inventors with the flexibility necessary for world-leading innovation.” - Eric Schultz

+ Read More
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