Help Save Our Heritage

Our region is stepped in history and heritage, we need to build a new facility displaying these artifacts.

OATLANDS - A BRIEF HISTORY
Oatlands was named by Governor Lachlan Macquarie on his return trip from Port Dalrymple to Hobart Town in 1821. Named after ‘Oatlands Park’ an estate of one of King George III sons, Fredrick, Duke of York and Albany. Oatlands was developed as a military town which housed convicts building the road between Hobart and Launceston.

Oatlands is one of Tasmania’s oldest settlements which has the largest collection of any Australian town with more than 100 sandstone and locally made brick buildings. Its intact Georgian townscape, mostly convict built in the early 1800s, offers a complete representation of the architecture, urban design and the cultural heritage of early European settlement in Australia.

The town’s authentic colonial character is reflected in the forty original sandstone and locally made brick buildings along the town’s main street. Some of the significant buildings include the Oatlands Goal, 1835, Commissariat’s Store and Watch House, 1830s, the Officers’ Quarters, 1830s and the Supreme Court, 1829.

During 1827, thirty-five skilled tradesmen and convict labourers arrived to begin work on the town site. The increasing number of convicts needed for this work, along with the increase in military guards all helped to increase the population of Oatlands.

There were 1820 land grants approved for free settlers in the district. Soon to follow were blacksmiths, bricklayers, bakers, wagoners, wheelwrights and millers which resulted in the building of the Callington Mill, now fully restored and once again grinding wheat.

To service the burgeoning amount of travellers and locals in the area, a number of breweries, hotels and travellers’ inns were being built in the township. These industries were good for employment in the town.

CAN YOU HELP?
The Oatlands Historical Society Inc was established in 1996, with the assistance of volunteer. They provide tourists and visitors with an unique museum that showcases the districts rich and varied history. You can explore a series of interpretative display modules - Life in an early settler’s cottage. Research your family’s local history and access a range of local historical publications.

The museum has an extensive collection of memorabilia illustrating Oatlands colourful heritage from the 19th century to the present day.

Oatlands is an important historical village on the shores of Lake Dulverton in the Midlands of Tasmania, Australia, located 84 kilometres north of Hobart, and 115 kilometres south of Launceston on the Midlands ‘Heritage’ Highway.

There is so much historical importance within the Oatlands district which has been recorded over many years by our members who have researched local families, events and buildings in and around the town which date back to the town’s beginning.,

Oatlands Historical Society have a wonderful collection of old photographs, books, papers and other memorabilia, some of which cannot be displayed as the current building is too small to accommodate these valuable historic pieces.

The Society has architectural plans for an extension to the building, which is why we are asking your your assistance to help get this extension built. If you can help with a donation to ensure that we retain these important historical artifacts safe and available to all future visitors.

Our dedicated volunteers keep the doors open to visitors between 10:30am to 4:00pm, seven days a week.

Donations

  • Tania & Doug Burbury 
    • $50 
    • 21 mos
  • Sarah Thornton 
    • $100 
    • 24 mos
  • Kay Buttfield 
    • $25 
    • 25 mos
  • Anonymous 
    • $50 
    • 25 mos
  • Rebecca White 
    • $100 
    • 25 mos
See all

Organizer

Patti Burbury 
Organizer
Tiberias, TAS
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