FinTwit War - Value vs. Growth

One fine day  Bill Brewster (@billbrewsterscg) made a comment about people "chasing heat" by investing in Zoom without proper knowledge.  Austin Lieberman (@7AustinL) took exception to his perception of what Bill was saying.  Some friendly trolling ensued and led to a bet.  

Bill, a stodgy old man, challenged Austin to a bet.  Bill offered to make a $2,000 wager that Qurate Retail's stock would outperform Zoom's stock (on a total return basis) over the 2.5 years ending  3/30/23 (began 8/28/20).  

Qurate Retail's primary assets include QVC and HSN (Home Shopping Network for you youngins).  Zoom is the company we have all used while stuck at home.  Zoom sports projected revenue growth in excess of 300%.  Qurate Retail's sales topped out in the year ended 12/31/18 and has a large business tied to an eroding TV ecosystem.

Bill never got the memo about buying growth so he is stuck digging around value stocks.  Austin, apparently wiser than Bill, has focused his attention on growthier stocks and was early to call Zoom a buy.  

This is a classic "value vs. growth" fistfight.  That classification is bound to trigger some people, but if QRTEA isn't value and ZM isn't growth then nothing is.  Also, we are having fun and marketing for a good cause here.  Everyone knows value and growth are joined at the hip.

Earlier this year, Bill lost a family member to suicide.  Consequently, he suggested AFSP as his preferred charity to donate to.  Austin happily agreed.  

Feel free to donate as you watch the value vs. growth boxing match.  Thank you for your time and consideration!

Sincerely, 
Bill and Austin

(written by Bill; in loving memory of Alexander E. Kearns)
  • Michael Hagan 
    • $20 
    • 6 mos
  • Anonymous 
    • $180 
    • 8 mos
  • Anonymous 
    • $10 
    • 8 mos
  • Anonymous 
    • $500 
    • 8 mos
  • Chas Cocke 
    • $50 
    • 8 mos
See all

Organizer

William Brewster 
Organizer
Palm Beach, FL
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention 
Registered nonprofit
Donations are typically 100% tax deductible in the US.