Charlie Cunningham Medical/Rehab

$149,165 of $200,002 goal

Raised by 2,255 people in 38 months
Jacquie Phelan
on behalf of Jacquie Phelan
 FAIRFAX, CA

In early August, 2015, Charlie Cunningham, bicycle builder, inventor and all around amazing person, fell off his bike and sustained several serious injuries.

Charlie suffered broken bones, bruises, and trauma to his head. At the time, he didn't feel his head injury was significant. Unfortunately, seven weeks later, the head injury manifested into a subdural hematoma, a life threatening condition that resulted in emergency brain surgery.  Having been about two minutes from death or complete vegetative state,  he endured a hell period of about six months, beginning with two months in intensive care, followed by months of doctor's visits and rehabiliitation. His days of getting around by bike were over, or so we thought.

Currently, Charlie is at the "plateau" level.  He has no sense of direction, nor much vision (his brain was affected, leaving the upper half of his visual field empty, as well as the periphery). But he is walking, speaking normally, with very little aphasia, and still working on learning the alphabet. he can read a simple news headline after about five minutes of careful study of each letter. We move about Marin on a gorgeous tandem, which will soon get a motor so we can go offroad, away from traffic.

His 'genius' resides now in his efforts to recover what most of us take for granted: balance, literacy and agency, the will to do things and make things, which seems to have disappeared when the brain bleed happened. Your donations will help to offset the costs of his rehabilitation and the visits to UC Berkeley Eye Clinic, and  the weekly respite care visits.  Thank you for your generosity.

A bit about the fund: it was dreamed up by Caroline James,  a good friend of Charlie and Jacquie's since the 1987.  She's an artist, web designer and was an early Wombat. Since the end of the first year of the fund, I have taken over most of the administration. Grant Petersen of Rivendell renown, and 1,200 donors like you have helped move us along, for which we're ever grateful.

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Dec 15, 2018
First time back on the electric tandem the other day…at Charlie’s suggestion! It was a sunny, very cold winter’s day. His being the instigator brought a smile to my face.
Being the one observing the progress, the way a mother does her growing child, is novel. When he was an inventor, he made huge strides, with creative combinations every single DAY, but I never noticed. It was simply “there”: a creative spark.
One time, having a serious conversation years and years ago, when I complained that he was letting people take advantage of him, and that he practically gave away his talent (at an hourly rate equivalent to a handyman, as opposed to an accomplished engineer)…and he said to me with solemn, gray eyes, “When you have the kind of gifts I have, you have to share them with the world”.
I will never forget that.
Today, reading about Chazz Palmintieri who directed Bronx Tale (I want to take Charlie to see it in town—my friends who play in the orchestra said it’s great), I learned that his hard working bus-driving father told him: “The saddest thing in this world is wasted talent.” A stab of shame hit me. Most of my life, I used to brag about how I was squandering my life racing bicycles. I also reported, under “List allergies” on countless forms: “Work”. I relish the word squander the way Salinger’s Esme loved the word “Squalor”. Something about the letter Q? Or is it the fact that it’s old, and Shakespearean? At any rate, I’ve let countless opportunities slide past: Charlie’s mother, Carol, would have happily set to type anything I wrote. Even book-length. She was a consummate letter press artist. I never turned in that Love Letter to A Rat that I’d told her about.
Wahhh. Now, I have all the time in the world between meals, etc. to write you my annotated, squandrous (that’s Charlie’s word) life. I somehow made a life, and enjoyed gobs and gobs of un-sold, non-commercial hours with which I could …dawdle. Daydream. And sometimes make collage postcards, or dream up silly stories for silly bike magazines before they were sold to ever more mainstream publishers.
So.
Here we are, perched on the low wall of the beautiful arched cement bridge at the base of Olema Hill (Joe Breeze’s uncle designed some part of the Sir Francis Drake road around here), two-thirds the way around the Nicasio loop. The sun’s angle is so low the spider webs are diamond-strands gently blowing in the breeze between the bay tree branches.
Another blog, I’ll tell you about roasting the bay nuts. For now I simply want to report that I’d like to stop squandering, and maybe use the myriad fifteen minute Empty moments doing typing rather than polishing the Augean kitchen floor.
Ever, JP
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Sorry to subject you to the THIRD attempt: something is new about Gofundme, and they've hidden the 'edit yr update' button, so I'm re-tooling this:
“I dreamt I was riding an electric bike” Charlie announced yesterday morning as we got up. “I wonder if you could help me get one to borrow?”.
My heart stopped. I know eight men who ride them, and at least two would happily lend him one, without querying me about the rashness of putting a purblind man on their machine.
I called up Wild Bill who happened to be home for the day wrestling with Apple because his phone won’t send pictures (he is an avid documenter of the Tuesday Bald Hill ride, which I’ve gotten to be regular on. On which..oh never mind. 7 am Tuesday mornings, I’m always at the corner meeting these old guys.
“Sure, come on up, you can use it 'til tomorrow” he said.
We drove up, got his heavy, reliable old green machine, and drove it home.
We suited up and I sent Charlie down the lane, with me following, so I could see how he handled the “Eco” mode (lowest amount of power). Flat pedals, too, btw. No 'entrapment'.
Then I got in front in order to lead him to the school, where the trails (fire roads, actually) begin. This route is precisely the reverse of his daily walk, but he doesn’t recognize it. His way-finding is so precarious, that if, on his walk, perchance 2 cars are passing one another at exactly our street, he’ll miss it owing to his fixation on the hazard of cars in the street, walk to the end of the school-street and realize he’s overshot it, then walk all the way back. Three out of four times he’ll see our street sign, but he doesn’t scan very thoroughly, so he might look about 280 degrees, and totally miss it. Which means he’ll walk all the way to the school, and either ask for directions or become aware he’s ended up on his walking route, and right himself.
I SO wish I could be in his skin. When we were courting, in the early 1980’s, we ached to get into each other’s skin, and waxed eloquent (not Armor-all, nor Pledge) about how neat it would be, to be the other. For a day. Max.
Well, I try to tell myself many times an hour, sometimes every minute, like a frantic prayer rosary “he can’t see well, he can’t see well, his visual processing is in the 20th percentile….” And proceed with extreme empathy, instead of being impatient old wombat. If you want to perceive Charlie's world (the visual part) close down yr rain jacket hood to about a 3x5 index card size. Then go out and ride your bike, or take a walk.
His mind was so meticulous, so ordered and so safety-conscious. It still is, but with such terrible fetters. I’m including two pictures I took of the contents of his fanny pack on the day of his crash. It was heartbreaking to see the birth certificate in there! And heartwarming to see the many custom micro tools, the hallowed Zeiss monocular…the ‘whimbreaker’ his exgirlfriend sewed him in 1979, all that stuff. Enjoy.
Wait, the ride, the ride.
OK, I steered him through the school (walking the narrow parts) and got onto the fire road where he carefully pedaled in and out of the shadows of the massive valley oaks. In bright sun he declared: “I can’t see a THING!” , but manned up without hesitating, kept pedaling. Up the three switchbacks and beyond. “How far have we come?”
“A couple miles”. I’d hoped he’d do the 8 mile loop around the little phony lake Lagunitas. But at Five Corners he said he’d like to return home, and down the hill we carefully crept. No mishaps. The narrow bits, the gate, the dip in the sidewalk at the school, these all were "near-crash" zones for him on his bike.
When we got home, he sighed, “I never dream that I've got bad eyesight. In my dreams I have perfect sight ”
I hope that won’t change. He’ll at least have carefree riding experiences during the many hours he sleeps. I’d hate to have him lose that freedom, since I know the brain doesn’t distinguish between imagined and ‘real’ experience. For all we know, the dream life is the true one. For three years at least, when he closes his eyes, he’s back to the old Charlie.
Sorry, I wish I knew how to edit. It's not cool to subject you to two of these in the same hour...
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Just threw away my finished blog about Charlie. GoFundme is testy; I should really pre-write on a safer platform, but here goes lap two, I'll type it faster.
“I dreamt I was riding an electric bike” Charlie announced yesterday morning as we got up. “I wonder if you could help me get one to borrow?”.
My heart stopped. I know eight men who ride them, and at least two would happily lend him one, without querying me about the rashness of putting a purblind man on their machine.
I called up Wild Bill who happened to be home for the day wrestling with Apple because his phone won’t send pictures (he is an avid documenter of the Tuesday Bald Hill ride, which I’ve gotten to be regular on. On which..oh never mind. 7 am Tuesday mornings, I’m always at the corner meeting these old guys.
“Sure, come on up, you can use it til tomorrow” he said.
We drove up, got his heavy, reliable old green machine, and drove it home.
We suited up and I send Charlie down the lane, with me following, so I could see how he handled the “Eco” mode (lowest amount of power). Flat pedals, too, btw.
Then I got in front to lead him to the school, where the trails begin. This route is precisely the reverse of his daily walk, but he doesn’t recognize it. His wayfinding is so precarious, that if perchance 2 cars are passing one another at exactly our street, he’ll miss it, walk to the end of the school-street and realize he’s overshot it, then walk back. Three out of four times he’ll see our street sign, but he doesn’t scan very thoroughly so he might look about 280 degrees, and totally miss it. Which means he’ll go all the way to the school, and either ask for directions or become aware he’s back on his walking route, and right himself.
I so wish I could be in his skin. When we were just getting to know one another, in the early 1980’s we ached to get into each other’s skin, and waxed eloquent (not Armor-all, nor Pledge) about how neat it would be the other. For a day. Max.
Well, I try to tell myself many times an hour, sometimes every minute, like a frantic prayer rosary “he can’t see well, he can’t see well, his visual processing is in the 20th percentile….” And proceed with extreme empathy, instead of being impatient old wombat.
His world was so meticulous, so ordered and so safety-conscious. I’m including some pictures I took of the contents of his fanny pack on the day of his crash. It was heartbreaking to see the birth certificate in there! And heartwarming to see the many custom micro tools, the hallowed Zeiss monocular…the ‘whimbreaker’ his exgirlfriend sewed him in 1979, all that stuff. Enjoy.
Ah! Don’t forget the ride, silly!
OK, I steered him through the school (walking the narrow parts) and got onto the fire road where he carefully pedaled in and out of the shadows of the massive valley oaks. In bright sun he declared: “I can’t see a THING!” , but manned up without hesitating, kept pedaling. Up the three switchbacks and beyond. “How far have we come?”
“A couple miles”. I’d hoped he’d do the 8 mile loop around the little phony lake Lagunitas. But at Five Corners he said he’d like to return home, and down the hill we carefully crept. No mishaps.
When we got home, he sighed, “I never dream that I’m impaired. I always have perfect sight in my dreams.”
I hoped that wouldn’t change. He’d at least have unfettered riding experiences during the many hours he sleeps. I’d hate to have him lose that freedom, since I know the brain doesn’t distinguish between imagined and ‘real’ experience. For all we know, the dream life is the true one. For three years at least, when he closes his eyes, he’s back to the old Charlie.
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A review of Women on the Move:
"American cycling, like art, has evolved through many crucial periods, and Roger Gilles brings back to life when women in the 1890s flew in tight packs around board tracks for cash prizes before as many as 10,000 spectators. These gals provided not only shows of strength, speed, and daring before women had the right to vote. They overcame prevailing Victorian notions of womanly independence, beauty, and strength. They rose above dominant chauvinistic attitudes. They competed aggressively on velodromes from Chicago to New York, from Seattle to Winnipeg, Canada, from Minneapolis to New Orleans and a slew of small towns in between.
Gilles, a writing professor at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, has finally brought back to light these long-forgotten heroines. His project was inspired by an artsy framed sepia postcard, circa 1897, adorning a wall in a Grand Rapids pizza café. The postcard featured Tillie Anderson, a Swedish immigrant from Chicago, pedaling a bicycle near an electric trolley on a well-known downtown stretch. The postcard declared, “Fastest bicyclist of her sex.” She was nicknamed The Terrible Swede for the strength she displayed in races.

Anderson was 22, under contact for Thistle Bicycles. She had labored in laundries by day and spent evenings as a seamstress to earn $3 a week. Eventually she purchased her first bicycle. Anderson started as a recreational cyclist when 100-mile centuries came into vogue. Her trainer-boyfriend Phil Sjöberg helped her develop speed and endurance.
It was a time of widespread cultural transformation. Electric light bulbs were replacing oil lamps in homes and businesses. Telephones, typewriters, and elevators were changing the way masses lived, worked, and played. Anderson joined other women taking advantage of recent chain-drive bicycles on diamond frames and pneumatic tires. Suffragette Susan B. Anthony remarked that bicycles “did more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.”
Anderson had blond hair, blue eyes, stood 5 feet 6, and weighed a lean 140 pounds. She and rivals raced hundreds of events on steeply banked velodromes built in baseball parks, on fairgrounds, as well as small steep “soup-bowl” tracks in armories, roller rinks, and civic auditoriums. Women battled in a variety of 25-milers up to six-day events, limited to three hours of racing daily; sixes proved so dramatic that customers kept coming back to see more. Anderson won races with $300 paydays—supporting her and Sjöberg in comfort. They planned to marry.
Gilles follows her and four others called the Big Five: Dottie Farnsworth of Minneapolis, who knew how to play to the crowd; Helen “Beauty” Baldwin of New York City; Berliner Lizzie Glaw; and Paris sprint champion Lissette, the nom de vélo of Amélie le Gaul. They generated oceans of newspaper and magazine articles, which boosted box-office sales.

Behind the circuits zigging and zagging for eight years around America and Canada were entrepreneurs. They smelled money and erected board tracks. But church groups, the medical profession, and the League of American Wheelmen forcefully denounced women’s racing.
The LAW threatened to permanently ban any men from participating in an event on the same program as women. By 1900, the LAW despaired so much about women’s racing, the advent of professional men’s cycling, and Sunday racing that the LAW turned all races over to the National Cycling Association, which had no interest in recognizing women racers.

Another age: Opening lineup of a race in Chicago on March 2, 1896. University of Nebraska Press photo
After 1902 Thistle bicycles and most of the country’s 300 manufacturers either went bust, merged, or retooled to make automobiles. As a result, prize money vanished. That year, Anderson’s boyfriend Sjöberg died at age 23 from tuberculosis.
Social resistance against the women’s circuit took its toll. Women’s racing in this country languished completely until the Amateur Bicycle League of America (predecessor to USA Cycling), in an effort to lift membership during the Great Depression, introduced the Girls’ national championship in 1937, when Anderson was 52. (The ABLA changed the name to the Women’s National Championship in 1954.)
When Anderson retired from racing she enrolled in a certification program to become a masseuse. She kept four scrap books bulging with accounts from newspapers, magazines, documents, and photos, including the Grand Rapids postcard. She lived to age 90 and died in 1965. In 2000 Anderson was inducted into the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame.
Her memorabilia stayed in the family, passed from one generation to the next, and served as a starting point for Gilles’s research. He devoted two years to reading archived newspapers. In Women on the Move, Roger Gilles dug deep into such a dynamic sports era. Anderson and her sisters in speed competed in front of crowds, created press attention, and received fistfuls of money.
Gilles has resurrected a time of women’s racing that we today didn’t know even existed. Thanks to Women on the Move, we can catch up and learn about pioneer women bike racers. "
I hope some of you will want to read this book (and Hearts of Lions too).
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Read a Previous Update
Matthew McKibben
38 months ago

As a home builder, what can I build for you? Ramps? Let's do a build party day and get it sorted out before he's out of the ER.

+ Read More
Grant Petersen
38 months ago

Charlie is one of half-a-handful of modern bicycle geniuses and personal heroes of mine (and I am basically "anti-hero"). Everything I know about him, I love. Everything he's ever designed or made or innovated on his own personal bike, I admire and wished I was that smart. I'm so sorry to hear of this accident. Of course we all want him back on his superlight plastic saddle, held by the seat post that also holds a pump. Go, Charlie.

+ Read More
Lennard Zinn
38 months ago

This is a tragedy and a wake-up call about head injuries and getting them checked out and monitored for a long time afterward. I was just thinking about Charlie last week; I was riding on Mt. Tam since 1981 at Thanksgiving when I rode it with Charlie and a number of other friends. He is creative genius, and a great human being to boot; I hope he gets his full faculties back soon. Get better soon, Charlie, and hang in there, Jacquie!

+ Read More
Paula Mara
38 months ago
6
6

Thank you Caroline, I am very grateful to you for making it possible to help our resourceful and generous friend THE Charlie Cunningham. Best wishes to all...XOXO

+ Read More
Alan Steinbach
37 months ago
3
3

OMG! I am kinda the Cunningham FP, having provided care for Bruce, Charlie's fighter pilot and custom home builder dad, and his tiny book and social antiquarian mom Carol. As a late comer to the world of off road biking, and having been privileged to visit Charlie's shop, I just wanted to confirm the need for this kind of funding effort. For all the closed head injuries that our lifestyle generates, we have a very unsupportive neuro-rehab environment here in the US and A. Maybe the rising tide of reality about football injuries will help, but not in time for Charlie. Any contribution you can make will really make a difference in his recovery.

+ Read More
Ben Schultz
31 months ago
2
2

Jacquie, while I absolutely love his thoughts on greeting age, something many of us are currently doing, my favorite thing is when he talks about the "milky silver finish". This finish is what I always thought was SO beautiful about Campy (you should excuse the expression!) equipment. As far as your personal struggle with responsibility, most of us have been there...we travel a path that is comfortable for us, where we can make the most of our abilities, and then when the situation changes, radically in your case, the flexibility we all develop allows us to change directions. You can do it. You have your friends in your area, and hundreds outside of that. We are all breaking as much wind for you both as is possible. Actually, that's maybe not the best choice of words...

+ Read More
Lisa Sebastian
34 months ago
2
2

I have had friends use this site to coordinate care/meals, etc: http://lotsahelpinghands.com. Wishing continual recovery for Charlie and some sleep for Jacquie. ♥

+ Read More
Mary James
35 months ago
2
2

Hi Jacquie, I love reading about Charlie's progress. Each small step being made gets him that much closer his goal! Keep the faith : )

+ Read More
Victor R. Hanson
38 months ago
2
2

Grant Cellini unicantor - just like Cinelli Bars in the early eighties because they had greater wall thickness to bend the bars. Here is to a speedy recovery Charlie - we want to see you on trails soon!

+ Read More
Pete Simpson
38 months ago
2
2

Great news Caroline! Thank you for the updates. Get well Charlie!!

+ Read More
Rob Wickens
38 months ago
2
2

Great info https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Cunningham I had seen his bike at the hall of fame in Fairfax. Speedy recovery Charlie!

+ Read More
Simon Sollberger
17 months ago
1
1

i can NOT wait to see that footage!!! I think of charlie every time i ride up Tam - and the other day i saw a gentleman with a cunningham racer - WALKING!! - i should have taken it away from him ; ) - still my holy grail of bikes - until then my 88 merlin will have to do - sending you love & strength

+ Read More
Mariann Jelinek
29 months ago
1
1

Yep. And "death-grip somersault " can be a lovely metaphor for how stuck we get in our own heads and fears, sometimes. Make that time to meditate, soak in a tub, walk in the woods, breathe, even write for 15 minutes or an hour: you've got to take care of YOU to be able to carry on. Peace and strength, Jacquie.

+ Read More
Richard Dahlgren
30 months ago
1
1

Don't look back, Jacquie! Look forward - there are still a lot of good things, and will be more to come! Think about the progress Charlie has made to date.

+ Read More
Bevin Barber-Campbell
32 months ago
1
1

Ah, that photo brings back great old memories. Mountain biking would be so much less without the contributions from both of you!

+ Read More
Ben Schultz
32 months ago
1
1

From the Rock-Shox shoot! Fantastic style and attitude!

+ Read More
Maryann Pearson
32 months ago
1
1

Jacquie this post makes me smile. Seems your spirits are lifting! Walking Bon Tempe and thinking of mud baths - all good. Wishing you and Charlie more lake walks and soft landings.

+ Read More
George McLaird
33 months ago
1
1

Thanks for this update. I'm no expert but I have heard wonderful things about crawling to help the brain to function better. But I've also heard it doesn't help. So, give it a try and see for yourself. My a 1000 unexpected blessings come your way

+ Read More
Lisa Sebastian
33 months ago
1
1

The link I posted earlier about MCIL was a typo when it was originally posted. The person meant Marin Center for Inpendent Living, not Memphis. I thought that was confusing! Here is the correct link: http://www.marincil.org/

+ Read More
Lisa Sebastian
33 months ago
1
1

I shared the link to Deer Park's Nextdoor.com community to let people know what's going on in case they want to contribute/help. Some suggestions came back that you may already have heard of: Marin Villages: http://www.marinvillages.org/content.aspx?page_id=0&club_id=134956 Brain Injury Network: http://www.binba.org Memphis Center for Independent Living (not sure what their national outreach is, but they were recommended): https://sites.google.com/site/mcilaction/

+ Read More

$149,165 of $200,002 goal

Raised by 2,255 people in 38 months
Created October 5, 2015
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DC
$50
David Cervantes
2 days ago

Great post, great insights Jacquie -edited or not.

$100
Anonymous
4 days ago
KT
$100
Katrina Thorstensen
5 days ago

Happy Birthday Jacquie! I'm also thinking of my dad whose birthday is Friday.

$100
Anonymous
5 days ago
PL
$100
Paul L
7 days ago

I had to look up "purblind" and for that enrichment I'm sending double of what I would have. Happy Holidays!

$50
Paul Ahart
11 days ago

Thanks so much for the signed water bottles and fridge magnets (delivered by Karen). Best wishes and recovery for Charlie.

Matthew McKibben
38 months ago

As a home builder, what can I build for you? Ramps? Let's do a build party day and get it sorted out before he's out of the ER.

+ Read More
Grant Petersen
38 months ago

Charlie is one of half-a-handful of modern bicycle geniuses and personal heroes of mine (and I am basically "anti-hero"). Everything I know about him, I love. Everything he's ever designed or made or innovated on his own personal bike, I admire and wished I was that smart. I'm so sorry to hear of this accident. Of course we all want him back on his superlight plastic saddle, held by the seat post that also holds a pump. Go, Charlie.

+ Read More
Lennard Zinn
38 months ago

This is a tragedy and a wake-up call about head injuries and getting them checked out and monitored for a long time afterward. I was just thinking about Charlie last week; I was riding on Mt. Tam since 1981 at Thanksgiving when I rode it with Charlie and a number of other friends. He is creative genius, and a great human being to boot; I hope he gets his full faculties back soon. Get better soon, Charlie, and hang in there, Jacquie!

+ Read More
Paula Mara
38 months ago
6
6

Thank you Caroline, I am very grateful to you for making it possible to help our resourceful and generous friend THE Charlie Cunningham. Best wishes to all...XOXO

+ Read More
Alan Steinbach
37 months ago
3
3

OMG! I am kinda the Cunningham FP, having provided care for Bruce, Charlie's fighter pilot and custom home builder dad, and his tiny book and social antiquarian mom Carol. As a late comer to the world of off road biking, and having been privileged to visit Charlie's shop, I just wanted to confirm the need for this kind of funding effort. For all the closed head injuries that our lifestyle generates, we have a very unsupportive neuro-rehab environment here in the US and A. Maybe the rising tide of reality about football injuries will help, but not in time for Charlie. Any contribution you can make will really make a difference in his recovery.

+ Read More
Ben Schultz
31 months ago
2
2

Jacquie, while I absolutely love his thoughts on greeting age, something many of us are currently doing, my favorite thing is when he talks about the "milky silver finish". This finish is what I always thought was SO beautiful about Campy (you should excuse the expression!) equipment. As far as your personal struggle with responsibility, most of us have been there...we travel a path that is comfortable for us, where we can make the most of our abilities, and then when the situation changes, radically in your case, the flexibility we all develop allows us to change directions. You can do it. You have your friends in your area, and hundreds outside of that. We are all breaking as much wind for you both as is possible. Actually, that's maybe not the best choice of words...

+ Read More
Lisa Sebastian
34 months ago
2
2

I have had friends use this site to coordinate care/meals, etc: http://lotsahelpinghands.com. Wishing continual recovery for Charlie and some sleep for Jacquie. ♥

+ Read More
Mary James
35 months ago
2
2

Hi Jacquie, I love reading about Charlie's progress. Each small step being made gets him that much closer his goal! Keep the faith : )

+ Read More
Victor R. Hanson
38 months ago
2
2

Grant Cellini unicantor - just like Cinelli Bars in the early eighties because they had greater wall thickness to bend the bars. Here is to a speedy recovery Charlie - we want to see you on trails soon!

+ Read More
Pete Simpson
38 months ago
2
2

Great news Caroline! Thank you for the updates. Get well Charlie!!

+ Read More
Rob Wickens
38 months ago
2
2

Great info https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Cunningham I had seen his bike at the hall of fame in Fairfax. Speedy recovery Charlie!

+ Read More
Simon Sollberger
17 months ago
1
1

i can NOT wait to see that footage!!! I think of charlie every time i ride up Tam - and the other day i saw a gentleman with a cunningham racer - WALKING!! - i should have taken it away from him ; ) - still my holy grail of bikes - until then my 88 merlin will have to do - sending you love & strength

+ Read More
Mariann Jelinek
29 months ago
1
1

Yep. And "death-grip somersault " can be a lovely metaphor for how stuck we get in our own heads and fears, sometimes. Make that time to meditate, soak in a tub, walk in the woods, breathe, even write for 15 minutes or an hour: you've got to take care of YOU to be able to carry on. Peace and strength, Jacquie.

+ Read More
Richard Dahlgren
30 months ago
1
1

Don't look back, Jacquie! Look forward - there are still a lot of good things, and will be more to come! Think about the progress Charlie has made to date.

+ Read More
Bevin Barber-Campbell
32 months ago
1
1

Ah, that photo brings back great old memories. Mountain biking would be so much less without the contributions from both of you!

+ Read More
Ben Schultz
32 months ago
1
1

From the Rock-Shox shoot! Fantastic style and attitude!

+ Read More
Maryann Pearson
32 months ago
1
1

Jacquie this post makes me smile. Seems your spirits are lifting! Walking Bon Tempe and thinking of mud baths - all good. Wishing you and Charlie more lake walks and soft landings.

+ Read More
George McLaird
33 months ago
1
1

Thanks for this update. I'm no expert but I have heard wonderful things about crawling to help the brain to function better. But I've also heard it doesn't help. So, give it a try and see for yourself. My a 1000 unexpected blessings come your way

+ Read More
Lisa Sebastian
33 months ago
1
1

The link I posted earlier about MCIL was a typo when it was originally posted. The person meant Marin Center for Inpendent Living, not Memphis. I thought that was confusing! Here is the correct link: http://www.marincil.org/

+ Read More
Lisa Sebastian
33 months ago
1
1

I shared the link to Deer Park's Nextdoor.com community to let people know what's going on in case they want to contribute/help. Some suggestions came back that you may already have heard of: Marin Villages: http://www.marinvillages.org/content.aspx?page_id=0&club_id=134956 Brain Injury Network: http://www.binba.org Memphis Center for Independent Living (not sure what their national outreach is, but they were recommended): https://sites.google.com/site/mcilaction/

+ Read More
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