Uganda soap

€3,851 of €5,000 goal

Raised by 29 people in 23 months

Hello, we are raising money for the development and education of 20 women in Kampala Uganda.  These mothers are members of MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers).  They are mostly teenagers.  All are UN educate.  Most are single.  In fact most cannot read or write.  They all make about 1 dollar a day selling porridge or soft drinks, or delivering food from small restaurants.  It is a hard life for the mothers, and offers no hope for their children.  Education is not free in Uganda.  So there are no funds for school fees. 

We are trying to raise the funds to send these 20 women to trade schools.  Right now we have 5 women in a tailoring school.  It is a 2 year program that teaches them to sew.  And we have become aware of a special need in Uganda.  30% of the school girls are dropping out of school because they cannot afford sanitary pads.  Pads cost $1.10 for a package of 10.  For many this is a day’s wages.  But our women are learning how to sew reusable sanitary pads. And we have adopted a rural school 4 hours from Kampala.  The school is called Katerero Primary and Secondary school.  It is in the Rakai district. This school has 300 girls.  Our women will try to sew 1800 sanitary pads (6 washable cloth pads per girl)  to give to these school girls, and if they get sponsorship for this job, the money they make will go towards the sewing school fees.  You can read more about this project on our blog.
http://teenmopsuganda.blogspot.de/
and more about this issue here
http://www.newvision.co.ug/new_vision/news/1328198/-girls-leaving-school-lack-sanitary-pads




We are also doing many other projects with this group to foster development.  For example soap ma
king and gardening. The goal is to teach these women marketable skills so they can earn money to climb out of poverty.  If we help these moms, they will have the means to help their children.  The sewing project is only one of the projects we are working on.  But it is having a powerful impact on these women.  A few months ago they were poor and with out hope.  Now they have learned to sew.  And they can use this skill to help 300 girls to stay in school.  And this really empowers our moms.  They were nothing, now they are empowered to change lives.  And we need your help for the actual fabric and the next terms fees for the sewing school.  Eventually we want to send all 20 of the moms through a vocational training program.   We thank you for helping to make this a reality.   


 



You may be interested to know....

Uganda is a landlocked country in the East of Africa. It is bordered by Kenya to the East, to the north by south Sudan, to the west by the Democratic Republic of Congo. Uganda has the youngest population in the World. Over 50% of the population is 18 years old or younger. The average Ugandan woman has 6 children. Free education doesn't exist.
The statistics also show that Uganda has the world's highest malaria incidence,  with a rate of 478 cases per 1,000 population per year.  Uganda ranks 6th in the malaria-related mortality rates.
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Update 10
Posted by Amy Moreno Heymann
8 months ago
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I have good news.  We received our first donation for a dairy cow.   Sylvia's husband has a farm outside of Kampala.  He is both a farmer and a trained veterinarian.   If we buy cows for the teen MOPS group, he will manage them for us.  Our women will receive milk every week.  And the extra milk will be sold to support our food program.   So I want cows.  They cost 300 dollars each.  If you or your group want to help teen MOPS in a tangible way give us a cow.  A dairy cow can produce between 15  to 40 liters of milk a day. It is a gift that will help the group for many years. We are grateful for your consideration.
I want to buy only the indigenous cows. They require less water, less care and are resistant to ticks. Many buy the foreign breeds because of a higher milk production. But often these cows need to be given drugs to keep them alive. They are not adapted to the environment.
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Update 9
Posted by Amy Moreno Heymann
13 months ago
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The women have finished sewing 1800 sanitary pads for school girls in Uganda. They will deliver these after the holidays. 30% of all school girls leave school because they lack sanitary pads. The sewing workshop is up and running. 10 women are learning the trade of tailoring. We need money for their daily food. We have also had to pay for medical costs. We are very thankful for your support.
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Update 8
Posted by Amy Moreno Heymann
17 months ago
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The poor do not have medical insurance


On Sunday Sylvia our MOPS coordinator got a call that a baby had accidentally knocked over hot milk, and they were burnt badly. She urged the mother to go directly to the hospital and she met them there. I got the text message. And the fear was great. The hospital cost 150 USD. This is 4 months income for this family. They already barely survive. The hopelessness in moments like this is extreme. I immediately said I would send them money. And to my amazement, the Western Union is even open on Sundays. So the mother did not need to wait long for the funds (a miracle) to be sent. And I have received donations this week to cover this need. This is, unfortunately, the 3rd time we have had to pay for medical costs this year. 2 burn cases and a life-saving C-section.
A few lessons about the poor…
It is easy to get burnt. They live in very tiny spaces and cook on wood fires. When my children were young we had a thing called an oven guard. It was mounted in front of the stove top to prevent pans from accidentally spilling. The poor do not have luxuries like this. They cook on open fires in their tiny homes. They deal with the smoke and the risk of fire and injury.
They do not have medical insurance. And when something like this happens hospitals will refuse care. Women die on the floor of Ugandan hospitals needing C sections but not having money to pay for them. Olive went to a clinic with serious burns. They gave her a shot of salt water and sent her home. She could have lost her leg or even her life because she had no money. When you hear about parents selling their children …it is often to pay for medical bills. You read about the kids in India working as bond slaves, or girls in Cambodia sold into prostitution. How does that happen? It happens for things like a burn that needs 100 dollars to be treated. The mother of the baby who got burnt on Sunday has many mouths to feed. There is no medical insurance. There was no way to cover the costs. They were desperate. The very poor do not have insurance.
Why do we care about giving these women skills? With skills, they can buy insurance. They can improve their standard of living. They can send their own children to school. There is little hope when you are selling corn or porridge on the street 10 hours a day. There is no hope when you make 1 dollar a day. So our challenge is to cover the urgent costs of things like burns and C-sections but invest heavily in skills that will eventually break this cycle of extreme poverty. We still need 600 USD to cover the total costs of renovation on the new skill center. And we need money for 3 more sewing machines. They cost 300 USD each. You can give me cash or send money to go fund me or by pay pal. I promise you 100% of your donations will go to the Teen MOPS group in Kampala.
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Update 7
Posted by Amy Moreno Heymann
22 months ago
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A young woman who is 8 months pregnant has come to the MOPS group for help. She has not seen a doctor. She has no money and no job. And there isn't any money for food. So the women in the group gave her food. They are not rich, but they are generous. And we are stuck with the question how can we help. We want to educate our mothers so they can break this cycle of poverty. Should we use the little money we have for a midwife? So many women die in childbirth. She is so afraid, and so are we. But we are determined to pay for education and skills. So I have been searching for some resources that could help this woman. I ask you all to pray for her. A midwife cost $350. A year of tailoring school cost $450. The midwife could save the women's life, but the education could pull an entire family from poverty. If women can sew, she can pay for the schools of her children, healthcare, and food. We need to stick to skills and education. But we are praying for a midwife. We pray for a free clinic or something we can refer her to.
trying to find a midwife
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€3,851 of €5,000 goal

Raised by 29 people in 23 months
Created February 22, 2017
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MP
€100
Milagros Pascual
28 days ago

For Sylvia and Emmanuel medical bill.

AM
€200
Anne Moore
4 months ago

Scholarship donation

€100
Jessica Cox
4 months ago

School funds. Here's to a year of amazing learning!

KH
€50
Kim Hatfield
4 months ago

School fees!

RM
€150
Rick Moreno
4 months ago

5 goats

€130
Anonymous
5 months ago
1
1
KP
€86
Karen Parks
6 months ago
LT
€20
Lauran Thomas
6 months ago

Katrina and Daniel...praying for you efforts in this mission.

€100
Dianna Frey
6 months ago
AM
€175
Angela McMillan
6 months ago

This is for Katrina and Daniel Funk. We love you guys and can't wait to hear about all the exciting work you were able to do in Uganda.

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