Support for Carol Warrior's Family

$21,482 of $20,000 goal

Raised by 304 people in 12 days
Created July 6, 2018
Carol Edelman Warrior was an Indigenous literature scholar, fighter for Indigenous rights, and lover of family, community and students whose great heart stopped on July 4 while she was within her beloved Sundance community in Montana.

Carol was enrolled with the Ninilchik Village Tribe and of Alutiiq (Sugpiaq), Dena'ina Athabascan, and A'aniiih (Gros Ventre) descent. As an Assistant Professor at Cornell University in the Department of English and Affiliate Faculty in American Studies and the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program, she focused on Native American, First Nations, and Alaska Native literatures, Indigenous philosophies, Indigenous futurisms, and Indigenous land-based practices.

Friends of Carol and her extended family have asked how they can help support the family as they deal with their unexpected great loss. In the midst of deep grief, her partner and children are in Montana and must make their way back to Ithaca, NY; her funeral costs must be paid for, and a financial cushion is needed to help with finding new housing and bridging the loss of their financial stability. Your love and prayers are essential, and if you can contribute materially, your donations would be greatly appreciated.


OBITUARY:
http://www.hollandbonine.com/obituary/carol-warrior?lud=2FCA6D670DB9C0F33161D92C6BC9236F

Carol Edelman Warrior
March 19, 1962 - July 4, 2018

Carol Edelman Warrior joined her ancestors on July 4, 2018 surrounded by the beautiful family that she created. There are no words for the loss we feel as we move into a world without her. Carol was our mother. She was our family, our grandmother, our teacher, caretaker, wife, and friend. Carol is deeply missed by her husband Shaawano Chad Uran, her children; Bryce (Christy) Stevenson, Lacey Stevenson Warrior, Brett Stevenson Warrior, Sage (Mika) Warrior, Cleo Keahna, Della Keahna Uran, Ike Keahna Uran and Smokii Sumac.

Carol carried the name Warrior in every aspect of her life. There was nothing she couldn’t do, including earning her PhD from the University of Washington in 2015. She fought hard for the lives of her children, and was most proud of all of our accomplishments; our graduations, performances, writing, singing, flute and drum-making, beading, gardening, and our babies. Carol loved her grandchildren Lily, Daphne, and the one on the way, with her whole heart and worked tirelessly to change this world to make it better for them, and for all her grandchildren yet to come. Carol taught us how to love. She was medicine, and we will honour her love as we move forward together as a family.

The wake will be held starting at 7pm Saturday, July 7 at the Agency Community Centre in Fort Belknap, and there will be a funeral service to follow at 11am Sunday July 8.

We thank you for joining us in grief at this time and ask, in lieu of flowers, donations be made to support the family.
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From Shaawano Chad Uran:

I was taught that the spirits watch how you handle problems. When they see you at your worst, at your most pitiful, then they know if you are worth helping at those times when you ask.

I was also taught that the spirits of the recently departed watch their loved ones for a bit, and so during that time it is important to show them that we miss them and love them, but that we are going to be ok because we are together and strong.

I’m still not sure how I am ever going to be ok again.

No, that’s not not it.

I’m still can’t imagine how I am ever going to be ok again, but I know that being ok again will depend on me being a good relative and a good friend.

Yes, that’s it.

I don’t really know how to be a good friend, but I am trying to learn. She taught us all how to be better relatives, and she even taught us that there are differences between friends and relatives. But I still have a lot to learn about being a friend.

The support and messages we have received from friends and relatives has shown me, and us, that we are surrounded by people who will help us be ok.

And we have each other. Standing strong, together, and showing the spirits that we are upholding our teachings and lessons from life, from ceremony, from stories, and from her.

In love and solidarity,
Shaawano Chad Uran
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From Shaawano Chad Uran:

I fell like I’m in pause mode right now. We walked through the University of Washington campus yesterday and saw our old shared office outside the American Indian Studies Department. I saw the display case where I hoped to someday see her book. I never thought I’d cry for missing our morning commute route. It was good to see things still happening, like the new Burke and workshops and other steps to prioritize native voices and languages at UW.

I’m glad we are here, and seeing so many loved ones and places she and I and the kids have shared. But I’m tired, and dreading the return to our home in Ithaca.

I’m taking the sense of being “in between” to take care of a few things. New brakes for the vehicle. An oil change. Getting the dog bathed. Checking the u joints. Tracking down the gear our son needs for his rock band camp. And finding some options to get two of the kids back to the Midwest for their summer activities and needed time with their family there because another long, hot, rushed road trip for them doesn’t sound like a good idea right now, even though I don’t want to be without them.

We haven’t had those tough conversations yet, either, but those will happen this weekend and Monday.

We all feel the outpouring of prayers and love and support from everyone she touched while she was with us. I’m told that there are messages sent though this campaign, but I can’t access them yet because I’m still on mobile. I guess those kind words will be most helpful once I get home.

In love and solidarity,
Shaawano Chad Uran
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from Shaawano Chad Uran:

I can’t imagine going through this alone. Thanks to her, we don’t have to. She made sure we had each other. Self-absorption was never an option. This makes the more surreal aspects of this seem almost silly, because that part of me that still can’t process, that just wants the whole world to stop and acknowledge her absence and my loss, is surrounded by a family who needs me. A family who also feels loss. A family whose worlds cannot stop.

One thing about having a lot of native friends and family is that there’s a lot of knowledge of grief. I’m not the first to lose the love of his life. My kids aren’t the first to lose their mother. We recognize this loss by taking care of each other. By having patience with each other. By allowing a certain amount of rawness but by also not allowing each other to isolate ourselves or fall into selfish habits as bad coping mechanisms. We talk. We even laugh. And of course we cry.

Yesterday I was told I would have to do all the things we did together before, so that her absence would be more real. I didn’t understand that at first, but I listen to my Elders. On our way west from Flathead, I cried at the St. Regis travel stop, a place we always got gas and snacks. We all got huckleberry milkshakes and it was hard but they were good. I cried when we went to Thorp antique and fruit mall for gas and snacks, because we always stopped there, and I saw the funny print she and I almost bought as a gift for our friend in Browning. I cried again as we went through Snoqualmie Pass where we used to pick huckleberries and blueberries around this time of year. And now sitting in our daughter’s apartment, writing this, trying not to cry yet because our granddaughters really need to bathe and dress and play and be kids.

One just asked for her. Asked to see her.

In her classes and mine we always emphasize that everything colonization did to us was intended to break a relationship. Relationships to land, law, authority, spirit, language, culture, economies, resources, medicines, other tribes, our children, and each other, were all disrupted by policy and practice. Therefore, to remake these relationships, to refuse to be isolated, is the most obvious way to resist, to help each other through all these disruptions, and to even remake ourselves in a healthier and happier ways.

We will be together for a little while in Seattle, before a few of us head east to take care of things and continue those parts of our lives that she wouldn’t want us to give up. It will be hard to go home without her, to see her things, her art, her unfinished projects. But it will be real, and we will not be alone.

In love and solidarity,
Shaawano Chad Uran
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Update from Shaawano Chad Uran:

My wife didn’t know how amazing she was, or how many people she touched, or lives she changed. She just knew one thing: that love was worth sharing, worth fighting for, and worth putting into everything she did or said. She demanded that we do the same, not by tough words, but by clear example. As academics, we dress up what we do with words like “reflexivity,” “relationality,” and “reciprocity,” and that’s okay. But she never let us forget that under those words, coursing with steadfast power and awareness, is love.

She would be surprised, maybe even embarrassed, at the level of support we have received in her honor. But she would—and will—be forever grateful, as we are, for all you have given to our family during our most difficult time.

I will post updates as we make it through the coming days. There are many things to take care of, such as relocating to something more affordable, dealing with financial and legal matters, and figuring out how we can grieve, mourn, and heal while also finding joy in her memory and each other.

For now, know that we as her family are holding together, and will do our best to carry on her work of building relations to our larger families, communities, cultural practices, and homelands. Because that is what she taught us to do.

In love and solidarity,
Shaawano Chad Uran
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$21,482 of $20,000 goal

Raised by 304 people in 12 days
Created July 6, 2018
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