Tuck.Space

Tuck.Space

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Founded by Tuck Muntarbhorn in July 2018, Tuck.Space is a spiritual art space in Hackney Wick, London, UK. For the next five years, Tuck.Space will house Tuck Muntarbhorn's works from The Holy Land (Jerusalem) series.

Tuck.Space has touched both the artist and visitors deeply. Some of our visitors' experiences are shared on the artist's website here

This campaign will help sustain Tuck.Space for five years from 2 July 2018 - 1 July 2023. Donations are welcome and deeply appreciated.

“I believe that fundraising is sacred work. It allows us to channel our resources to our highest commitments. My highest commitment is making art and sharing this in a specifically designed, sacred space. If you love the mission of this project, please donate. Thank you so much.” – Tuck Muntarbhorn

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Planning Your Visit

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Visit Tuck.Space, a spiritual art space by Tuck Muntarbhorn.

Admission is free. Donations are deeply appreciated. All are welcome.

On display are works from Muntarbhorn's photographic series, The Holy Land  (Jerusalem).

“May this space offer stillness and selfward focus.” – Tuck Muntarbhorn

“Muntarbhorn is a force of nature. At all times, his persona, vision, and creative output seek a visualisation of a world free from prejudice and labels, and a genuine meeting with a true self. His work carries the light he constantly aspires to, as he envisions a type of elevation that transcends cultural conditions and social schemes.” — Elena Stanciu, Petrie Magazine

“The Holy Land invites comparison with the Rothko Chapel paintings of 1964-67 and, closer to home, Rothko’s Seagram murals (1958-9) at Tate Modern. Their solemn colours, their large scale - in some cases six foot square - and the subtlety of the relationships that they capture between tones and colours are all reminiscent of Rothko’s attempt to attract the attention of viewers to the numinous, indeterminate space of depth that hovers beyond the limiting surfaces of the seen world.” — Andrew Spira

Location:
Tuck.Space
56 Dace Road
London E3 2NQ
UK

Opening Times (by appointment only):
Saturday 12pm–6pm
Sunday 12pm–6pm

To book an appointment, please email:
tuck@tuck.co

About the Artist


My name is Tuck Muntabhorn and I live and breathe as a spiritual artist.

Since I began my career as an artist, I began to look for a universal language in my artworks – one that could speak to everyone. My artistic practice has been dedicated to capturing places and objects that are associated with religion, spirituality and ancient civilisations around the world with a camera. I try my best to allow nature’s light (as it enters my camera) to reveal Her beauty and the unity of all spiritual paths. 

“I believe that the highest function of an artist is to make beauty manifest. By beauty I mean nature’s eternity, the radiance of Life or God’s infinite Being.” — Tuck Muntarbhorn

About Tuck.Space:

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Tuck.Space is spiritual art space curated and designed by Tuck Muntarbhorn. Tuck.Space is situated in London’s creative district, Hackney Wick (which held London’s 2012 Summer Olympics) and is situated opposite Bridget Riley Studios.

Tuck.Space currently houses three large photographs (180 x 180 cm in size), alongside other smaller works from Muntarbhorn's photographic series, The Holy Land, which were taken during his trip to Israel and the West Bank in 2017.

“My intention is to design and create spiritual environments where people of any faith, religion or inclination can find a space to think, meditate and contemplate in whatever way they feel is natural for them...a space where everyone will be equally at rest.” — Tuck Muntarbhorn

"Although these sites [in Jerusalem] are highly charged with religious and political implications - now more than ever - they are abstracted here to the point at which their distinctive features cease to be recognisable. It is as if the images offer non-objective contemplation as a means through which to transcend religious differences, and the conflict and misery to which they lead." — Andrew Spira

Donations

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This campaign will help sustain Tuck.Space for five years from 2 July 2018 - 1 July 2023. Donations are welcome and deeply appreciated. You can donate any amount via this platform.

Donations specifically contribute to the rental cost of the Tuck.Space for five years (60 months) from 2 July 2018 - 1 July 2023.

The current monthly rent for this space is £606 (subjected to changes in rental fees). The cost of rent for the next five years (60 months) is estimated to be at £36360. It is this total amount that this campaign is aiming to raise.

Purchasing my works to support Tuck.Space:

To get in touch about purchasing my other artworks, please email: tuck@tuck.co

Thank you so much for your help and spending your time reading this campaign.

With deep gratitude,

Tuck Muntarbhorn
Spiritual Artist 
Website 



About The Holy Land

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Text: Andrew Spira

Tuck Muntarbhorn’s most recent collection of photographic works, The Holy Land, represents a further stage in the artist’s quest to translate an ineffable perception of the Sacred into a series of contemplative spaces, accessed through visual experience. Although the works seem to be abstract or non-objective, they are in fact photographs of sacred sites that Muntarbhorn took during a trip to Israel and the West Bank in 2017. Concentrated in and around Jerusalem, the sites in question are sacred to the three major monotheistic religions of the world - Judaism, Christianity and Islam. They include one of the oldest synagogues in the world - at Capernaum, where Christ is said to have preached; the Sea of Galilee; the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem; the Church of the Holy Sepulchre; the Western ‘Wailing’ Wall and the Dome of the Rock which is especially sacred to both Jews and Muslims. Although these sites are highly charged with religious and political implications - now more than ever - they are abstracted here to the point at which their distinctive features cease to be recognisable. It is as if the images offer non-objective contemplation as a means through which to transcend religious differences, and the conflict and misery to which they lead.

 At a purely visual level, The Holy Land invites comparison with the Rothko Chapel paintings of 1964-67 and, closer to home, Rothko’s Seagram murals (1958-9) at Tate Modern. Their solemn colours, their large scale - in some cases six foot square - and the subtlety of the relationships that they capture between tones and colours are all reminiscent of Rothko’s attempt to attract the attention of viewers to the numinous, indeterminate space of depth that hovers beyond the limiting surfaces of the seen world. However, whilst every brush stroke of a Rothko painting is consciously applied by the artist, Muntarbhorn capitalises on the ability of photography to displace the activity of creativity away from the ‘artist’ towards the autonomous processes of nature, and thereby to encompass aspects of the world that are not determined by the artist’s capacity to see and represent them. Moreover, he capitalises on the luminosity of light - in contrast to the opacity of paint - that is innate in the medium of photography. Speaking of his own working process, Muntarbhorn has said: “as I stand in front of an object, I ask for nature’s light to use me and the camera to reveal her sacred Beauty and, in this very case, unity – I don’t desire my conditioning to dull her Truth – that’s not my job. Hence, I am more comfortable in defining my works as nature’s ‘light drawings’ than ‘my photographs’.” 

Although the associations of Muntarbhorn’s work with the great monotheistic religions infuses them with an aura of both sanctity and antiquity, they ignore - or ‘are ig-norant of’ - any fundamental ground for religious difference. On the contrary, they aspire to capture something of the dignity and mystery that characterises the austere religiosity of each of these ancient civilisations. One such association is the colour purple which, throughout antiquity, was invested with literally ‘awe-some’ characteristics. Largely due to the immense cost of the dye that was used to create this deep hue, the colour was reserved for the ruling classes. Indeed in Byzantium, it was associated exclusively with the imperial family. Mosaics from the sixth century show the emperor and empress draped in its magnificence. In some exceptional cases, the same honour was extended to sacred texts, especially gospel books. In several manuscripts from the same period, pages of parchment were stained ‘royal purple’ and their texts were written in gold, and sometimes silver, as if the words were directly transcribed from a transcendental source without ever being uttered in the world.

The Holy Land resonates with these elusive qualities, evoking a depth in time and majesty, just as it evokes a depth in space. It is a feeling for these depths that Muntarbhorn seeks to address in his viewers. But while the works are solemn, they are not grave. Rothko’s descent into darkness was paralleled by his descent into depression and eventual suicide, but Muntarbhorn’s work never signifies a metaphorical loss of light. On the contrary it is made of light, and constitutes a free meditation on graded zones of luminosity: indeed, by working on the same image in both positive and negative form, it explores the iconic effects of darkness and light equally - contemplating the act of seeing itself. Having said that, in some ways his images also resemble what one sees when one’s eyes are closed - a faint suggestion of light filtered through the blood of one’s eyes. As such, they also belong to an innately interior and living world; or, given that they sometimes resemble nebulae - an infinite number of stars and suns, both rising and eclipsed - perhaps an inner ‘universe’ might be more apt? Rich in imaginative associations, but also in the immediacy of sensation, Muntarbhorn’s work suggests that when sacred space expands, distant times and places can become included in the monumental moment of presence. Everywhere becomes The Holy Land.

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Red™*, a light installation at Tuck.Space

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Donations (0)

  • Anonymous 
    • £1,800 (Offline)
    • 10 mos
  • Anonymous 
    • £1,800 (Offline)
    • 11 mos
  • Anonymous 
    • £4,580 (Offline)
    • 11 mos
  • G. Crete 
    • £215 (Offline)
    • 22 mos
  • Steve Rees 
    • £100 
    • 23 mos

Organizer

Tuck Muntarbhorn 
Organizer
London, Greater London, United Kingdom
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