Help a Humble Hero

Scott is the kind of guy who not only would do anything to help a friend, but would add something extra (you didn’t ask for) onto the favor simply because that is who he is.

In fact, I struggled to come up with a title for this post, but it was important to convey the message of him (and Michelle) as humble. They do not air their dirty laundry, and in fact, few people know Scott is even still sick after all these years. Not because they are so private, but because he would rather talk about how you are doing or check in to see if everything is ok, than he would talk about his illness. They are very strong and independent people who are honest, genuine and believe in the power of giving to others. But Al and I truly are thankful they agreed to let us post this, as it is important for their friends and family to be given the opportunity to show them how much we care and be a part of the solution for Scott. And now, it is our turn to help this humble hero to get the medical treatment he needs, and ease the burden of travel costs associated for the procedure.

To share some of the backstory, Scott graduated from Oak Ridge Military Academy and went on to graduate from the Citadel in 1991. At that time, he became a Greensboro Police Officer where he served the citizens with, distinction and honor, for 16 years. Among his many accomplishments as a decorated officer, he was a crash investigator and as a senior detective in the Special Victims Unit where he investigated domestic violence and adult sex crime cases. Here he certainly changed many lives in a positive and rewarding way.

Sadly, Scott began having acute pancreatitis during his tenure at the police department and such began a long spell of severe pain, trips to the doctor and missed work from his dream job. Eventually, he was diagnosed with Pancreas Divisum, a congenital anomaly where there are two distinct ducts instead of one. A surgery at Duke for modified Whipple worked for a few years, but eventually the problem worsened, and Scott found himself again back in the hospital. In 2004, the University of Maryland attempted an auto islet transplant, but this failed due to the fact that no insulin cells could be harvested to inject into the portal vein of the liver.

As this challenge ensued, and after using his vacation and many days which were donated by his police family, Scott made the very tough decision to retire from the career that he loved so much. For years after, he battled with a number of challenges created by his body due to the condition and absence of critical organs in the body. From infections, to liver damage and medicine side effects, it has been a battle that he is strong enough for but has certainly taken its toll.

Eventually, Scott came to work with me as a security consultant and private investigator. I remember the day that we originally talked about it, at the Starbucks off of New Garden. We laugh about it to this day, because we both were thinking that we were getting the better deal. For Scott, he was happy to be able to be connected to his previous world of law enforcement and put his mind to something other than just being sick. But opposite, I was really happy to have such an awesome ex-cop to conduct investigations, consult clients on security matters and just a great “brother-in-blue” to work with after so many years.  

As the medical challenges became greater, Scott was able to work less and less but he pushed himself wherever possible. Even as early as a couple years ago, he was volunteering by delivering meals on wheels, all the while putting his own health at risk to serve others. In fact, one such trip ended in a seizure and emergency trip to the hospital where he spent weeks recovering.

Now, his fatty liver has turned into NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) and caused cirrhosis of the liver. And while his MELD (model end stage liver) score is low, he has faced numerous hospital stays with severe symptoms, often worse than those with higher scores in some instances.

The solution is a living liver donor surgery and this could be his best chance to get back to the quality of life that this humble hero deserves. The procedure would require an extensive 3 month stay in Maryland, including apartment rentals, utilities, food and other expenses. This, while Michelle balances a home in Greensboro, 2 dogs and elderly family.

Michelle and Scott don’t ask for help and they were reluctant to let us ask it for them. They are both strong people who have faced this adversity with perseverance, fortitude and a positive attitude.

So, Al and I are asking you all to please help us to support a respected former police officer, investigator, volunteer and great friend. Help us to ease the challenges on Michelle, a retired special education teacher who now works tirelessly as she commutes to doctor offices and hospitals instead of to the school and back.

We hope to raise enough money to cover the costs for not only Scott & Michelle, but also the very kind donor who steps up to give something even greater. Please donate so we can help them make this an easier road ahead; paved with the ability to focus on each other, on getting healthy and not on the stress that will surely come with the challenges ahead.

Thank you for your kind generosity to the Caviness family!

Sincerely,

Al Ferguson & Greg Leimone


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Donations

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  • Anonymous 
    • 50 $ 
    • 4 hrs
  • Anonymous 
    • 25 $ 
    • 4 d
  • Jay Wagner 
    • 500 $ 
    • 6 d
  • Michael Mango 
    • 100 $ 
    • 8 d
  • Jeter Yates 
    • 50 $ 
    • 11 d
See all

Organizer and beneficiary

Greg Leimone 
Organizer
Oak Ridge, NC
Michelle Caviness 
Beneficiary
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