Mabel needs Surgery


Meet Mabel 14wk old Shepherd/Border Collie mix. She is my foster dog (Happy Tails Dog Rescue) loving, sweet and all she wants to do is play like a puppy but yet she can't..
See Miss Mabel is in desperate need of surgery!! She was diagnosed with PDA, a condition her brother passed away from on 6/26/17 RIP Bruno. If she does not have this surgery in 3 weeks her condition will get worse and I don't even want to think what may happen then.
What is Patent Ductus Arteriosus:
The aorta is the main artery that feeds oxygenated blood from the left side of the heart to the body. The pulmonary (lung) artery travels from the right side of the heart to the lungs, carrying deoxygenated blood to be oxygenated. Once the blood has been oxygenated by the lungs, it then returns to the left side of the hearty through the pulmonary veins to be pumped out into the body by the aorta.
In the womb, the fetus’ descending aorta is connected to the pulmonary artery by the ductus arteriosus blood vessel, allowing blood to flow directly from the right side of the heart to the aorta, without stopping for oxygen in the lungs. This is because the fetus gets its oxygen from the mother's bloodstream and does not yet need to have its own blood oxygenated.
Normally at birth, this connection is no longer patent (open). Once a newborn has begun to breath on its own, the pulmonary artery opens to allow blood to flow from the right side heart into the lungs to be oxygenated, and the ductus arteriosus closes. But in patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) the connection remains patent. Consequently, blood is shunted (diverted) in abnormal patterns in the heart. PDA allows blood to flow from the aorta into the pulmonary artery, and then to the lungs.
If the shunt is moderate to large, it can cause left-sided congestive heart failure from blood volume overload on the left side of the heart. Less frequently, a large-diameter PDA will cause injury to the blood vessels in the lungs, from the excess amount of blood flowing into he lungs. High blood pressure in the lungs, and reversal of the shunt so that the blood goes from right to left (pulmonary artery to the aorta), as well as the typical PDA shunt direction of left to right (aorta to pulmonary artery) can be expected. This atypical right to left shunting of a PDA can cause the aorta to carry blood that is low in oxygen, sending a signal to the body to produce more red blood cells (since they carry oxygen), making the blood too thick.
The condition or disease described in this medical article can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects cats, please visit this page in the PetMD health library.
SYMPTOMS AND TYPES
Respiratory (breathing) distress:
Coughing
Exercise intolerance
Increased breathing rate
Right to left shunting PDA:
Hind legs are weak during exercise
Blood is thicker than normal, causing:
Arrhythmias (irregular heart beat)
Right to left blood clot
Pink, or bluish gums, and bluish skin around the anus or vulva
Possibly left-sided congestive heart failure
Rapid, irregular heart beat
Stunted growth
TREATMENT
The dog may be given oxygen therapy, nitrates, and cage rest. When your pet has regained stability, it will be scheduled for surgery as soon as possible.

This surgery will SAVE Mabel's LIfe!
If you could find it in your ❤️ to help us raise money for her surgery Miss Mabel and Happy Tails Dog Rescue would be furever grateful






Donations

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  • Jerry and Gini Avolio 
    • $100 
    • 42 mos
  • Dawn Byrnes 
    • $100 
    • 42 mos
  • Kelly Sonnett  
    • $30 
    • 42 mos
  • Nick Sonnett 
    • $10 
    • 42 mos
  • Michael Turman 
    • $5 
    • 42 mos
See all

Organizer

Tricia Stillway 
Organizer
West Islip, NY
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