Miracle 4 Michael

$30,190 of $30k goal

Raised by 644 people in 13 months
Jennifer Hohman  HOUSTON, TX
Michael John Riley Jr. is an amazing 14 yr. old young man who loves his family, is a great student and talented athlete. He qualified for Junior Olympics three times, is in the National Honor Society and WITH A MUCH NEEDED MIRACLE has a great future ahead of him.

After getting back from Sugar Creek Baptist Church camp in early August Michael was ready to continue his cross country training by running 12 miles a day.  On Thursday, August 13th he enjoyed a wonderful sunny day by going on an annual school trip to Sam Houston State Park with his new high school track team and coach.  ‘The boys ran, did strength exercises and swam in the lake throughout the day.

That weekend was spent with family and friends hanging out and preparing for a track meet, and back to school activities.  Just barely a week later, Wednesday August 19th Michael woke up with a headache and slight fever.  Being cautious Michael’s mom Cassandre took him to a local clinic, but they didn’t find a clear sign of what was wrong.  Thursday his headache got a bit more intense, he had less energy but was still able to go with dad, Michael, to get a haircut and be ready for his first day as a freshman in high school.

Friday was not only a rainy and miserable day in Houston but for the Riley family it was one that will never be forgotten. Our Michael took a turn for the worse, he was visibly disoriented, had an unbearable headache and his neck hurt much like meningitis symptoms.  Mom and Dad immediately got him to Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH) – West Campus where thankfully their attending doctor made the connection with a different case from only 3 weeks before with the same symptoms. 

TCH performed many tests but also a ran an uncommon one that would help diagnose that Michael had contracted a brain eating amoeba called Naegleria fowleri which then causes a rare disease, Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM).   We have now come to understand that the amoeba entered Michael’s body when he JUMPED in the LAKE and WATER was forced into his NOSE. Although VERY RARE it is more likely to occur during and after HOT SUMMER MONTHS. The amoeba attached itself to the nerve that goes to the frontal lobe of the brain. (see below for a more thorough description).

Knowing the severity of his condition TCH immediately transported Michael to Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston’s treasured Medical Center.  Many medical experts are involved and an experimental drug from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) which was flown in from Atlanta and is being administered to our Michael now.  We are thankful to be living in this great city.

Upon arrival the amazing medical team from both hospitals have worked tirelessly to keep our little guy comfortable and well taken care of.  He is in critical condition and every hour is a waiting game to determine if he will pull through.  The odds are not good but with our family, friends and community, the family’s Lakewood Church and all of the insurmountable prayer we KNOW God is healing our baby’s body. 

We will be using this site to keep everyone updated and most importantly to CREATE AWARENESS to as many family’s as possible.  Please be EXTRA CAUTIOUS and EDUCATE yourselves on the risks of PAM.  Although this is a VERY rare situation and circumstance the hot summer months breed the danger of this amoeba. This is now the 2nd case within the past month in the Houston area. 

Please, please, please educate yourselves.  There is only one success case that we know of in Arkansas...we are hoping we will have the same story to tell very soon.  We do not know the road ahead for our family but we are praying for a long one instead of a short one.

Thank you for your love, support and prayers! 
Michael John Riley Jr’s family

MEDICAL DESCRIPTION
http://www.webmd.com/brain/brain-eating-amoeba 

A PAM STORY... that we hope will be ours too
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2013/09/11/12-year-old-brain-eating-amoeba-survivor-kali-hardig-heads-home/
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 2.8K total shares
Isabel Peña
13 months ago

From one hurting family to another. Just a few weeks ago we lost our beloved angel, to a similar case like this. Unfortunately it was too late for her & for the doctors to do anything. I pray to god may he heal this young boys body. Prayers out to the family.

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
4
4

Amebic Meningoencephalitis Kelly L. Hickman The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Abstract This paper discusses the incidence of a rare and often fatal condition that typically effects the younger population. A parasite, Naegleria fowleri, resides in warm fresh waters worldwide and has taken the lives of 98% of those reported to have contracted it. While research is lacking, there have been advancements in diagnostic and treatment modalities. Funding for such a rare issue is scarce; however, effective education for healthcare professionals that can be shared with the public will help prevent infection. Keywords: Naegleria fowleri, primary amebic meningoencephalitis, free-living amoeba, parasite Amebic Meningoencephalitis Introduction to the Issue Background Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare, acute infection of the brain that results in necrosis and hemorrhage (Fero, 2010; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). As of 2012, there have only been 12 known survivors of the approximate 200 documented cases (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). PAM is caused by the free-living, thermophilic microscopic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri (N. fowleri), commonly referred to as ‘the brain-eating amoeba’. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014b) (CDC) the amoeba is found in fresh warm waters worldwide, especially lakes, rivers, canals, geothermal springs, warm water discharged from power plants, and sediment. The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) reports that N. fowleri begins to flourish when temperatures reach approximately 86 degrees Fahrenheit (2013). It thrives between 95-113 degrees, and the ideal temperature for growth of the infectious form of the amoeba is 107.6 degrees (Fero, 2010; VDH, 2013). The CDC (2014b) and Saddiqui & Khan (2014) report that N. fowleri may also be found in warm, stagnant swimming pools, as well as warm contaminated tap and well water used to flush the sinuses for health or cultural purposes. The amoeba cannot cause infection through the digestive tract, so drinking water containing N. fowleri is not a concern (CDC, 2014b; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). There are more than 30 species of Naegleria known, however humans know only N. flowleri as pathogenic. Another species of Naegleria studied in laboratory mice produced knowledge of the pathogenesis of N. fowleri for further research (Fero, 2010). History The literature states that N. fowleri was first discovered in 1899, with reported infections occurring in Virginia in 1937 (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). However, the first documented PAM infection in the United States was in 1962 and in Australia in 1965. Since then, 132 people have been infected in the U.S, and of those, 53% of infections have occurred in Texas and Florida. There have also been cases reported from Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Virginia, New York, Minnesota, and North and South Carolina (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). From 2004 to 2013, 34 cases were reported. Of the 132 total cases reported in the U.S., only three individuals have survived (CDC, 2014). Worldwide, there have only been a few hundred cases reported, primarily in the developed countries of Europe (France), Australia, and the U.S., however, recent reports are stemming from developing countries, such as Pakistan (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). Epidemiology of the Issue The amoeba feeds on organic debris and bacteria and exists in three forms. The cyst form is environmentally stable and develops in response to unfavorable conditions such as cooler temperatures, reduction in food supplies, overcrowding, and decreased water supply. The cyst form can return to the infective form if introduced into favorable environments, such as the human nasal passages. The trophozoite form is the mobile, infective, and reproductive form of the amoeba. This is the predominate form found in a warm, nutrient-rich, aquatic environments. The flagellate form is the more mobile form, and it occurs as a response to environmental changes in pH or ion concentration (Fero, 2010; Siddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). The hypothesis is that risk of infection increases when the density of the amoeba reaches 100 organisms per liter of water (VDH, 2013). N. fowleri enters the body through the nose and travels along the neuroepithelial route of the olfactory nerves to the highly vascularized subarachnoid space. This provides a route for the trophozoites to be scattered to other areas of the central nervous system (Fero, 2010). Once in the brain, it destroys brain tissue, causing cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, herniation, and death (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). In the United States, infection occurs most often in the months of June, July, and August. Prolonged hot and dry seasons have increased water temperatures and the population of the amoeba in fresh water supplies (Saddiqui &

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
4
4

I did a research paper on this for my MSN in epidemiology. The only survivor with no long-term brain issues was treated with 2 CDC drugs and hypothermia. How can I post my research on here?

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
3
3

So sorry for the long post, but I am a mother of an 8 y/o boy. I felt compelled to share this info with the family. My hopes and prayers are with you.

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
3
3

Amebic Meningoencephalitis Kelly L. Hickman The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Abstract This paper discusses the incidence of a rare and often fatal condition that typically effects the younger population. A parasite, Naegleria fowleri, resides in warm fresh waters worldwide and has taken the lives of 98% of those reported to have contracted it. While research is lacking, there have been advancements in diagnostic and treatment modalities. Funding for such a rare issue is scarce; however, effective education for healthcare professionals that can be shared with the public will help prevent infection. Keywords: Naegleria fowleri, primary amebic meningoencephalitis, free-living amoeba, parasite Amebic Meningoencephalitis Introduction to the Issue Background Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare, acute infection of the brain that results in necrosis and hemorrhage (Fero, 2010; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). As of 2012, there have only been 12 known survivors of the approximate 200 documented cases (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). PAM is caused by the free-living, thermophilic microscopic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri (N. fowleri), commonly referred to as ‘the brain-eating amoeba’. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014b) (CDC) the amoeba is found in fresh warm waters worldwide, especially lakes, rivers, canals, geothermal springs, warm water discharged from power plants, and sediment. The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) reports that N. fowleri begins to flourish when temperatures reach approximately 86 degrees Fahrenheit (2013). It thrives between 95-113 degrees, and the ideal temperature for growth of the infectious form of the amoeba is 107.6 degrees (Fero, 2010; VDH, 2013). The CDC (2014b) and Saddiqui & Khan (2014) report that N. fowleri may also be found in warm, stagnant swimming pools, as well as warm contaminated tap and well water used to flush the sinuses for health or cultural purposes. The amoeba cannot cause infection through the digestive tract, so drinking water containing N. fowleri is not a concern (CDC, 2014b; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). There are more than 30 species of Naegleria known, however humans know only N. flowleri as pathogenic. Another species of Naegleria studied in laboratory mice produced knowledge of the pathogenesis of N. fowleri for further research (Fero, 2010). History The literature states that N. fowleri was first discovered in 1899, with reported infections occurring in Virginia in 1937 (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). However, the first documented PAM infection in the United States was in 1962 and in Australia in 1965. Since then, 132 people have been infected in the U.S, and of those, 53% of infections have occurred in Texas and Florida. There have also been cases reported from Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Virginia, New York, Minnesota, and North and South Carolina (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). From 2004 to 2013, 34 cases were reported. Of the 132 total cases reported in the U.S., only three individuals have survived (CDC, 2014). Worldwide, there have only been a few hundred cases reported, primarily in the developed countries of Europe (France), Australia, and the U.S., however, recent reports are stemming from developing countries, such as Pakistan (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). Epidemiology of the Issue The amoeba feeds on organic debris and bacteria and exists in three forms. The cyst form is environmentally stable and develops in response to unfavorable conditions such as cooler temperatures, reduction in food supplies, overcrowding, and decreased water supply. The cyst form can return to the infective form if introduced into favorable environments, such as the human nasal passages. The trophozoite form is the mobile, infective, and reproductive form of the amoeba. This is the predominate form found in a warm, nutrient-rich, aquatic environments. The flagellate form is the more mobile form, and it occurs as a response to environmental changes in pH or ion concentration (Fero, 2010; Siddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). The hypothesis is that risk of infection increases when the density of the amoeba reaches 100 organisms per liter of water (VDH, 2013). N. fowleri enters the body through the nose and travels along the neuroepithelial route of the olfactory nerves to the highly vascularized subarachnoid space. This provides a route for the trophozoites to be scattered to other areas of the central nervous system (Fero, 2010). Once in the brain, it destroys brain tissue, causing cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, herniation, and death (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). In the United States, infection occurs most often in the months of June, July, and August. Prolonged hot and dry seasons have increased water temperatures and the population of the amoeba in fresh water supplies (Saddiqui &

+ Read More
13 months ago
1
1

From the Peete Family to Yours, our deepest most sincere condolences...

+ Read More
Robert Heggen
13 months ago
1
1

May God Bless and Heal you...My son recently returned from Turner Falls and I am sure your familiar with that. He is ok..thank God. Please keep everyone posted on Michael's condition as our thoughts and prayers go out to him and his family... Sincerely; RSH

+ Read More
Karen Denson
13 months ago
1
1

WOW what a testimony...fall asleep here on earth & wake up in our Heavenly Father's arms. For the family left behind please listen on YouTube to the song Wonderful Peace, for this is my prayer for yall. God bless & I look forward to being with yall in Heaven.

+ Read More
Shayla Ashley
13 months ago
1
1

I'm terribly to hear about the loss through a recent update. My prayers are with the family and friends. I know what it's like to lose a loved one. May his memory live on. God bless and keep you all.

+ Read More
Alfred Georges
13 months ago
1
1

To the Family of Michael: There is a Healing Pastor in Argyl Texas that can heal little Michael. His Name is Thurman Scrivner. at The Living Saviour Ministries. Look him up on You Tube to see the great healings he has perforemed in the Name Of Jesus. He is the real deal, If you want someone that Can say "I Guarantee you are healed in the name of Jesus"Please do not delay and contact him at the following e-mail tls_ministries@hotmail.com He will not charge you anything. God Bless and Keep you in the Name of Jesus.

+ Read More
John Amajimjam
13 months ago
1
1

Am sending my prayers and hope; Kelly - thank you for posting the information below! Michael's condition is being treated by his doctors, and they have to make decisions of risk / benefit, in a condition where all treatments are experimental and standard treatment was a 1% or less success rate. PLEASE : Someone ask the treating team to Google (or use Medline) and search for the following phrase : 'Chlorpromazine Naegleria Fowleri'. This is NOT medical advice... but the treating physicians MUST be aware of the results of this search, and MUST read the peer-reviewed journal articles that dominate the first page of Google, and Medline / Pubmed, and decide if it is either relevant - or not - only they know his case in detail. Someone please tell them!!! Kelly - I wish there was a way to discuss this with you further as well. Sending my prayers for Michael and his family; hoping for the best!

+ Read More

$30,190 of $30k goal

Raised by 644 people in 13 months
Created August 24, 2015
AC
$20
Adelelmo Corona
4 months ago
SG
$50
sue grant
9 months ago

in honor of your wonderful son Michael.

$10
Anonymous
11 months ago (Monthly Donation)
MJ
$50
Marshall Jefferson
11 months ago (Monthly Donation)
DD
$30
Daniel Dallacasa
11 months ago

God Bless You Michael. And you Matt for helping this child!

SF
$29
Simmons Family
12 months ago
$1,054
Anonymous
12 months ago
$10
Anonymous
12 months ago (Monthly Donation)
MJ
$50
Marshall Jefferson
12 months ago (Monthly Donation)
$100
Anonymous
12 months ago
Isabel Peña
13 months ago

From one hurting family to another. Just a few weeks ago we lost our beloved angel, to a similar case like this. Unfortunately it was too late for her & for the doctors to do anything. I pray to god may he heal this young boys body. Prayers out to the family.

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
4
4

Amebic Meningoencephalitis Kelly L. Hickman The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Abstract This paper discusses the incidence of a rare and often fatal condition that typically effects the younger population. A parasite, Naegleria fowleri, resides in warm fresh waters worldwide and has taken the lives of 98% of those reported to have contracted it. While research is lacking, there have been advancements in diagnostic and treatment modalities. Funding for such a rare issue is scarce; however, effective education for healthcare professionals that can be shared with the public will help prevent infection. Keywords: Naegleria fowleri, primary amebic meningoencephalitis, free-living amoeba, parasite Amebic Meningoencephalitis Introduction to the Issue Background Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare, acute infection of the brain that results in necrosis and hemorrhage (Fero, 2010; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). As of 2012, there have only been 12 known survivors of the approximate 200 documented cases (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). PAM is caused by the free-living, thermophilic microscopic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri (N. fowleri), commonly referred to as ‘the brain-eating amoeba’. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014b) (CDC) the amoeba is found in fresh warm waters worldwide, especially lakes, rivers, canals, geothermal springs, warm water discharged from power plants, and sediment. The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) reports that N. fowleri begins to flourish when temperatures reach approximately 86 degrees Fahrenheit (2013). It thrives between 95-113 degrees, and the ideal temperature for growth of the infectious form of the amoeba is 107.6 degrees (Fero, 2010; VDH, 2013). The CDC (2014b) and Saddiqui & Khan (2014) report that N. fowleri may also be found in warm, stagnant swimming pools, as well as warm contaminated tap and well water used to flush the sinuses for health or cultural purposes. The amoeba cannot cause infection through the digestive tract, so drinking water containing N. fowleri is not a concern (CDC, 2014b; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). There are more than 30 species of Naegleria known, however humans know only N. flowleri as pathogenic. Another species of Naegleria studied in laboratory mice produced knowledge of the pathogenesis of N. fowleri for further research (Fero, 2010). History The literature states that N. fowleri was first discovered in 1899, with reported infections occurring in Virginia in 1937 (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). However, the first documented PAM infection in the United States was in 1962 and in Australia in 1965. Since then, 132 people have been infected in the U.S, and of those, 53% of infections have occurred in Texas and Florida. There have also been cases reported from Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Virginia, New York, Minnesota, and North and South Carolina (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). From 2004 to 2013, 34 cases were reported. Of the 132 total cases reported in the U.S., only three individuals have survived (CDC, 2014). Worldwide, there have only been a few hundred cases reported, primarily in the developed countries of Europe (France), Australia, and the U.S., however, recent reports are stemming from developing countries, such as Pakistan (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). Epidemiology of the Issue The amoeba feeds on organic debris and bacteria and exists in three forms. The cyst form is environmentally stable and develops in response to unfavorable conditions such as cooler temperatures, reduction in food supplies, overcrowding, and decreased water supply. The cyst form can return to the infective form if introduced into favorable environments, such as the human nasal passages. The trophozoite form is the mobile, infective, and reproductive form of the amoeba. This is the predominate form found in a warm, nutrient-rich, aquatic environments. The flagellate form is the more mobile form, and it occurs as a response to environmental changes in pH or ion concentration (Fero, 2010; Siddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). The hypothesis is that risk of infection increases when the density of the amoeba reaches 100 organisms per liter of water (VDH, 2013). N. fowleri enters the body through the nose and travels along the neuroepithelial route of the olfactory nerves to the highly vascularized subarachnoid space. This provides a route for the trophozoites to be scattered to other areas of the central nervous system (Fero, 2010). Once in the brain, it destroys brain tissue, causing cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, herniation, and death (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). In the United States, infection occurs most often in the months of June, July, and August. Prolonged hot and dry seasons have increased water temperatures and the population of the amoeba in fresh water supplies (Saddiqui &

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
4
4

I did a research paper on this for my MSN in epidemiology. The only survivor with no long-term brain issues was treated with 2 CDC drugs and hypothermia. How can I post my research on here?

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
3
3

So sorry for the long post, but I am a mother of an 8 y/o boy. I felt compelled to share this info with the family. My hopes and prayers are with you.

+ Read More
Kelly Robeson
13 months ago
3
3

Amebic Meningoencephalitis Kelly L. Hickman The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Abstract This paper discusses the incidence of a rare and often fatal condition that typically effects the younger population. A parasite, Naegleria fowleri, resides in warm fresh waters worldwide and has taken the lives of 98% of those reported to have contracted it. While research is lacking, there have been advancements in diagnostic and treatment modalities. Funding for such a rare issue is scarce; however, effective education for healthcare professionals that can be shared with the public will help prevent infection. Keywords: Naegleria fowleri, primary amebic meningoencephalitis, free-living amoeba, parasite Amebic Meningoencephalitis Introduction to the Issue Background Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare, acute infection of the brain that results in necrosis and hemorrhage (Fero, 2010; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). As of 2012, there have only been 12 known survivors of the approximate 200 documented cases (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). PAM is caused by the free-living, thermophilic microscopic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri (N. fowleri), commonly referred to as ‘the brain-eating amoeba’. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014b) (CDC) the amoeba is found in fresh warm waters worldwide, especially lakes, rivers, canals, geothermal springs, warm water discharged from power plants, and sediment. The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) reports that N. fowleri begins to flourish when temperatures reach approximately 86 degrees Fahrenheit (2013). It thrives between 95-113 degrees, and the ideal temperature for growth of the infectious form of the amoeba is 107.6 degrees (Fero, 2010; VDH, 2013). The CDC (2014b) and Saddiqui & Khan (2014) report that N. fowleri may also be found in warm, stagnant swimming pools, as well as warm contaminated tap and well water used to flush the sinuses for health or cultural purposes. The amoeba cannot cause infection through the digestive tract, so drinking water containing N. fowleri is not a concern (CDC, 2014b; Saddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). There are more than 30 species of Naegleria known, however humans know only N. flowleri as pathogenic. Another species of Naegleria studied in laboratory mice produced knowledge of the pathogenesis of N. fowleri for further research (Fero, 2010). History The literature states that N. fowleri was first discovered in 1899, with reported infections occurring in Virginia in 1937 (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). However, the first documented PAM infection in the United States was in 1962 and in Australia in 1965. Since then, 132 people have been infected in the U.S, and of those, 53% of infections have occurred in Texas and Florida. There have also been cases reported from Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Virginia, New York, Minnesota, and North and South Carolina (Myint, Ribes, & Stadler, 2012). From 2004 to 2013, 34 cases were reported. Of the 132 total cases reported in the U.S., only three individuals have survived (CDC, 2014). Worldwide, there have only been a few hundred cases reported, primarily in the developed countries of Europe (France), Australia, and the U.S., however, recent reports are stemming from developing countries, such as Pakistan (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). Epidemiology of the Issue The amoeba feeds on organic debris and bacteria and exists in three forms. The cyst form is environmentally stable and develops in response to unfavorable conditions such as cooler temperatures, reduction in food supplies, overcrowding, and decreased water supply. The cyst form can return to the infective form if introduced into favorable environments, such as the human nasal passages. The trophozoite form is the mobile, infective, and reproductive form of the amoeba. This is the predominate form found in a warm, nutrient-rich, aquatic environments. The flagellate form is the more mobile form, and it occurs as a response to environmental changes in pH or ion concentration (Fero, 2010; Siddiqui & Khan, 2014; VDH, 2013). The hypothesis is that risk of infection increases when the density of the amoeba reaches 100 organisms per liter of water (VDH, 2013). N. fowleri enters the body through the nose and travels along the neuroepithelial route of the olfactory nerves to the highly vascularized subarachnoid space. This provides a route for the trophozoites to be scattered to other areas of the central nervous system (Fero, 2010). Once in the brain, it destroys brain tissue, causing cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, herniation, and death (Saddiqui & Khan, 2014). In the United States, infection occurs most often in the months of June, July, and August. Prolonged hot and dry seasons have increased water temperatures and the population of the amoeba in fresh water supplies (Saddiqui &

+ Read More
13 months ago
1
1

From the Peete Family to Yours, our deepest most sincere condolences...

+ Read More
Robert Heggen
13 months ago
1
1

May God Bless and Heal you...My son recently returned from Turner Falls and I am sure your familiar with that. He is ok..thank God. Please keep everyone posted on Michael's condition as our thoughts and prayers go out to him and his family... Sincerely; RSH

+ Read More
Karen Denson
13 months ago
1
1

WOW what a testimony...fall asleep here on earth & wake up in our Heavenly Father's arms. For the family left behind please listen on YouTube to the song Wonderful Peace, for this is my prayer for yall. God bless & I look forward to being with yall in Heaven.

+ Read More
Shayla Ashley
13 months ago
1
1

I'm terribly to hear about the loss through a recent update. My prayers are with the family and friends. I know what it's like to lose a loved one. May his memory live on. God bless and keep you all.

+ Read More
Alfred Georges
13 months ago
1
1

To the Family of Michael: There is a Healing Pastor in Argyl Texas that can heal little Michael. His Name is Thurman Scrivner. at The Living Saviour Ministries. Look him up on You Tube to see the great healings he has perforemed in the Name Of Jesus. He is the real deal, If you want someone that Can say "I Guarantee you are healed in the name of Jesus"Please do not delay and contact him at the following e-mail tls_ministries@hotmail.com He will not charge you anything. God Bless and Keep you in the Name of Jesus.

+ Read More
John Amajimjam
13 months ago
1
1

Am sending my prayers and hope; Kelly - thank you for posting the information below! Michael's condition is being treated by his doctors, and they have to make decisions of risk / benefit, in a condition where all treatments are experimental and standard treatment was a 1% or less success rate. PLEASE : Someone ask the treating team to Google (or use Medline) and search for the following phrase : 'Chlorpromazine Naegleria Fowleri'. This is NOT medical advice... but the treating physicians MUST be aware of the results of this search, and MUST read the peer-reviewed journal articles that dominate the first page of Google, and Medline / Pubmed, and decide if it is either relevant - or not - only they know his case in detail. Someone please tell them!!! Kelly - I wish there was a way to discuss this with you further as well. Sending my prayers for Michael and his family; hoping for the best!

+ Read More
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