Get Black Children Into Children's Books

$470 of $5,000 goal

Raised by 13 people in 34 months
Michael Strickland   NAMPA, ID





It is time for a SEQUEL! Family relationships were explored and affirmed in my joyful anthology of poems celebrating the diversity of African American families, shown above. In this book, I collaborated with my mother, noted educator Dorothy Strickland, to bring us this warm collection. Rich and powerful poems by Eloise Greenfield, Lucille Clifton, and others are rooted in deeply felt values of belonging and mutual respect.

Families: Poems Celebrating the African American Experience
came out in 1994. Close to two decades later, we still see several problems in the world of children's books. The biggest problem is still a severe lack of texts with African American children as the main characters.

I highlighted the need for such literature in a May 16, 2013 blog entry. Author Varian Johnson was noted. He quoted a librarian who said:

"At the risk of sounding desperate, can anyone name me just ONE middle grade novel published in 2013 starring an African-American boy?"

"She later followed up with a post listing all the books published in 2013 featuring African-American boys as main characters," this famous black Young Adult author added. "If I'm counting correctly, the number is somewhere around eight. Maybe ten, when you count some of the small publishers."

"You have no idea how depressed this makes me feel," Varian said. ": There are a lot of theories why these books aren't being published. Maybe authors aren't writing them. Maybe editors and agents aren't acquiring them. Maybe readers don't want them."
_____

This makes me sad too. Friends have pointed to two or three books -- that is awful since the Library of Congress reports 15,000 to 20,000 new children's books published every year. So I choose to be a part of the solution, and will write, compile and collect a sequel to Families: Poems Celebrating the African American Experience. Black children will be the main characters, and I will have a special emphasis on those missing black boys.

Money donated will help with expenses related to the book, including hiring an illustrator; writing time; copyright permissions; phone and technology expenses for interviews and research; office materials; and professional manuscript reviewers.

Gift Cards to stores such as OfficeMax, Staples, WalMart, Fred Meyer, and other chains are also welcome.

Please help us make a change for the INVISIBLE CHILDREN in children's books.
_____

BIO: Michael Strickland teaches literacy education at Boise State University. The author of ten books for adults and children, he travels nationally speaking about learning, teaching, diversity and child advocacy.
_____

For more on me and my writing, see:
http://bit.ly/stricklandspeaking

Here are my books on amazon: http://bit.ly/StricklandBooks

Follow my in-depth discussion about books at: https://www.facebook.com/youpublish

I am:

... the publisher of http://youngpeoplespavilion.com

For articles around the net, see:
http://bit.ly/youngpeoplespavilion

.... A contributor to Yahoo Network:
http://yhoo.it/1fy5H20

The Book Bear:
http://the-book-bear.dailykos.com


Mailing Address:
5210 Cleveland Blvd.
Suite 140 Unit 145
Caldwell, ID 83607

This Google search for "Michael Strickland Idaho" has more info: http://bit.ly/V42VVE

Peace! And thanks for all you do for children!

- Michael

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Update 7
28 months ago
AUTHORS: Feel Free to Post Your Promotional Material Here: https://www.facebook.com/youpublish
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Update 6
28 months ago
Thanks to all of you who have donated so far!
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Update 5
30 months ago
The source of the information below is:
Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century by Monique W. Morris. Read more at http://amzn.to/1i1Gcbp
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Update 4
30 months ago
1) 42 percent of Black children are educated in all high-poverty schools (both elementary and secondary). By comparison: 38 percent of Latino children are educated in high-poverty schools, 31 percent of Native American children are educated in high-poverty schools, 15 percent of Pacific Islander and Asian children are educated in high-poverty schools, and 6 percent of White children are educated in high-poverty schools.

2) Black youth make up 16 percent of public school students and 9 percent of private school students in grades K"“12 nationwide but account for: 35 percent of in-school suspensions, 35 percent of those who experience one out-of school suspension, 46 percent of those who experience multiple out-of-school suspensions, and 39 percent of those who are expelled.

3) The unemployment rate for Black high school dropouts is 47 percent. By comparison, the unemployment rate for White high school dropouts is 26 percent.

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$470 of $5,000 goal

Raised by 13 people in 34 months
Created October 23, 2013
Michael Strickland     NAMPA, ID
$5
Anonymous
30 months ago
JC
$100
Joe Clarken
30 months ago

Keep up the great work Michael!

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JJ
$5
Jimmy Johnson
30 months ago

Great idea. Glad to see it rolling again. We look forward to seeing your work!

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MB
$50
Michelle Bennett
33 months ago
AN
$25
Amy Nelson
33 months ago
SB
$25
Sybril Bennett
33 months ago
$25
TJ Thomson
34 months ago
PT
$60
Patrick Tevlin
34 months ago

The entire Tevlin Family wish Mike great success with this very worthy venture for our children. We believe in you Mike!!!

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NW
$100
Neil Waldman
34 months ago
$20
Anonymous
34 months ago
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