Help Create the ResqRanch!

$1,590 of $7.0M goal

Raised by 30 people in 28 months
The Resqranch has been rescuing, retraining, and rehoming, cast-off horses  from the racing industry, as well as other animals,  for over 20 years.

A portion of all proceeds from Aspen Park Vet Hospital in Conifer, goes towards helping make our dream a reality. We have been providing FREE classes to our local community for  children and adults, on all things related to animal care, training, safety and behavior for over 3 years.   We are a Colorado Registered Charity listed as the Prince of Flame Fund.  If you are interested in having our very own Dr. Jena Questen veterinarian and professional speaker, host a presentation at YOUR next event, please contact us at help@DrQandU.com.
This is a photo of one of the many beautiful horses from the racetrack that is  at high risk for ending up shipped to a slaughter house across our US borders. The USDA estimates that nearly 2,000 horses a WEEK are shipped for slaughter, every year!  

Won't you help us please do everything we can to help make sure gorgeous animals like this one, don't end up shipped to a painful death in a slaughter facility, and instead enjoy retirement in a loving home?

This is what YOU can do;
1) Donate cash, or better yet sponsor an animal monthly, even a small amount goes a long way!
2) Donate services, or gifts to assist with care of the animals, or to use as prizes at events (with full recognition of your contribution, of course)
3) Help us spread our message through social media: 
- like us on Facebook, the Resqranch
- subscribing to our YouTube channel, The1DrQ
- sign up for our newsletter at   www.DrQandU.com
-like and share DrQ's  social media posts across outlets (Twitter, Instagram, Pintrest, Linkedin, etc.)
4) Help connect us with equine facilities in the area who might benefit from having a qualified professional willing to offer clinics and seminars, on either health, behavior, and/or training, for either FREE or greatly reduced cost. 
5) Help us connect with other like-minded animal rescue's and organizations. 
6) Help us connect with generous sponsors, donor's, and grants which might help us further our cause. 
7) Attend our events, and spread the word!



 Please help us build our vision to have a world class facility, multi-million dollar facility with the very first Children's Museum for Pets, an adoption center, an indoor arena for dog shows, horse shows, and training clinics, a lodge, a veterinary hospital, and an aquaculture learning lab and fish hospital.  Through this sanctuary, we can  continue to give classes, rescue and rehome animals, as well as provide education, so that inevitably there is no more need for animal shelters, or rescue's, in the first place!
From the bottom of our hearts, we give thanks for any help for the day- to- day needs of the animals! *HUGS!*
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Dear all,

Wow I can't believe how long it's been since I posted an update!
I must admit, it's been reluctance on my part, because we had to stop training with Oliver and turn him out to pasture. He suffered an accident and was injured. He is recovering nicely out on 800 acres, however, he will not be returning to training soon.
Since then, we started training another one of our rescue horses, Rhoen. However, since then I purchased, and moved an entire veterinary practice, so posting training updates has had to wait. Fortunately, the good news is that now that veterinary practice is a means to even further help spread the word about the Resqranch and help it become that much more of a reality! Stay tuned, the racing season is starting and the potential for rescuing more horses is upon us, as well as now we have a platform and a venue for seminars and events! 2018 should be an exciting year of change! Stick with us and help make the ResqRanch a reality that much sooner! Best to you all! DrQ
Enjoy your freedom at pasture Oliver!
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Hi folks!
Wow I can't believe it's already been a month since we started this training program! And even more importantly, I am so excited we have folks signing up for our FREE classes to learn more about what we are doing and how to do it for themselves!
Two days ago Oliver had an appointment with the farrier to get his shoes reset. We discovered that he has a hoof abscess in his left front foot at the worst site of his hoof injury. This could definitely account for why he has been sore on his left front hoof. I am actually relieved we have found this, as it means we have hope that once the abscess grows out, it could be that he returns to 100% soundness.
We had to give him a couple of days off so that he could rest and recover from getting his shoes reset.
We will resume training with him again in a few days.
Thanks in advance to all of you out there who are enjoying following along with us on this training and learning adventure. Please post your comments and questions on our Facebook page @ResqRanch. And if our mission and vision touch your heart, please consider donating to our cause, and share these posts.
Thank you to you all, god bless!
Looking good!
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Hi everyone!
DrQ here again with another installment in the training of Oliver.
Last week we had helpers to assist with working with him, so it was a new, good experience for him to have the support of two people, even if one of them is a very small, inexperienced young person.
That is the beauty of the program we follow here at the Resqranch. It doesn't matter if the trainer is young, old, feeble, or strong, if you follow the program as it is outlined, you will stay safe, and get the job done without force, fear, and nearly zero chance of injury. Now what other horse trainer claims that from their program? NONE that I have ever heard of!
So now that he is lunging quietly in both directions at all gaits, we now introduce a rider, WITHOUT A BRIDLE, just seat, and legs. We like to teach the seat and legs cue's as a completely separate set of instructions, before beginning to add the use of reins of a bridle.
How do you know if your rider is ready to pick up the reins? The answer is simple. Can the rider balance themselves in the saddle, heels down, rear end up and out of the saddle (the classic 2-point position), without falling forward or back with the horse moving at the trot? If so, then voila, the proof is there, the rider is stable enough in their core to hold themselves up and not inadvertently give the horse incorrect rein signals. If not, as is the case in the photos with our young rider who is still struggling to keep her heels down in the stirrups, it's no problem at all, just keep her riding on the lunge until she builds the strength and coordination. It is good practice for the horse, nice because the rider's weight is very light and easy on the animal (especially one recovering from an injury like Oliver).
Additionally, how do you know if the horse understands the signals from the reins? Well, that is the reason we teach that lesson completely separately, through the use of the long lines. In this way, we can introduce the horse to what the signals from the reins mean, without the additional stress of being on them.
Once horses learn the two lessons, the rein signals and the leg/seat signals, that is when we put those two lessons together to complete the process of learning how to respond to being ridden.
In conclusion, this week with Oliver he had the opportunity to practice just carrying a light person without the added burden of being pulled on by reins. Today we worked him in the long reins around cones perfecting his responsiveness to the rein aids, as well as mixed it up a little by introducing clicker training to teach the Spanish walk (a good one to look up videos on youtube if you have never seen that before). All in all, lessons are progressing smoothly and slowly, even a little boring. With horses, boring is good, because then everyone stays safe around this potentially dangerous thousand pound easily frightened animal.
On that note, it's time to head off to the feed store to buy more bedding for his stall and refill our supply of grain. Please forward this blog on to anyone interested in training animals, especially horses. And if our mission touches your heart, please donate to our worthy cause so we can continue to expand the program. In fact, if you live in the Conifer area and would like to have FREE private training lessons, please contact me as we currently have openings for children and adults at the Resqranch.
May your holiday preparations by peaceful and full of joy! God bless!
Look, no hands!
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Hi folks! As promised here is the next installment in Oliver's training log. Training started in earnest for Oliver 12 days ago. With a rescue horse you never know what training they have had in the past, so you always just must ask them all the basic questions and see how they respond. This is the how we proceed, through a series of steps that begin with just putting the halter and lead rope on, through a series of exercises including lunging and work over ground poles and cavaletti, then moving on to more complex maneuvers 'in hand' as it is called with long reins, until they are ready to be ridden. This is the stage we are at with Oliver.
We call this step 8 in our program. We have accomplished this all in 13 days and working less than an hour a day. Of course, all results vary by the age of the animal, it’s previous training, it’s disposition, and history (eg if abused or neglected things may take longer or may never be repairable).

Oliver has accomplished all these tasks, with ease and enjoyment, except for one seemingly minor issue, which is him not wanting to long rein out of the barn and into the outdoor arena.
He has been led through this area and walked back and forth on it probably 12 or more times. He was always a little nervous about it, but he developed a complete refusal to proceed forward from the barn to the outdoor arena. He will go when led on a halter on lead, but with head erect, neck stiff, ears pricked at strong attention, at barely paying attention to anything I ask as he is fixated on everything around there, from the shadows, to the barn, to the horse trailers parked nearby, to the horses around him, etc.
I have been ignoring it because it didn’t seem like a real problem to me, since he would lead with a little encouragement, and I figured he just needed some time to get used to all the sights and sounds.
However, the two times I have asked him to go first, as in, long rein him with me behind him, he gets very frightened and refuses to proceed. If I become sterner in my asking him, he begins to panic and tries to spin out and evade, trying to go up dangerous embankments, and generally causing mayhem with the reins and making it so that it’s dangerous for passers by to accomplish what they need to around us because he is so unpredictable and panicky.
Having an assistant walk with him by his head works every time, but it feels too pampering and unrealistic. After all, this isn’t the first time he’s seen this area or walked through it. The difference is having to go first. But of course, when your riding your horse has to ‘go first’, so the trust HAS to be there, and you want it there before you risk your life and get on the animal’s back.
Needless to say I didn’t feel good about how the lessons were going, and I had been giving it lots of thought for several days trying to brainstorm and figure out what could be going on in his head.
So yesterday I tried something completely different. I just brushed him, gave him treats, then used the clicker and my treat bag to just lead him, me first, down the short path to the outdoor arena. To my surprise, even with no pressure from the saddle, cavesson, surcingle, side reins, or any other equipment, he was STILL reluctant and scared, and would only barely take grain from me, chewing nervously and throwing his head around in fear, having to stop and encourage him about 18 stops and starts to get him the simple 75 feet from the barn door to the arena gate.
This was like a light bulb illuminating what we always teach at the Resqranch, ANIMALS DON’T LIE (for the very most part). So if an animal tells you it’s scared, it probably is, even if it seems flipping ridiculous to you. All you can do, as the mammal with the more advanced brain, is give them the benefit of the doubt, and help them work through it. Which I did with Oliver, and will continue to do so, until he can accomplish this task without fear and anxiety.
Sometimes we must take a step back to notice the obvious in front of us.
Thanks Oliver for teaching me once again to be more sensitive and caring as you do your very best every day to learn everything asked of you every day. Good boy.
Thanks for tuning in. If you have questions about how we are working with him, please don't hesitate to ask! I love sharing information, after all, that is the whole purpose of the ResqRanch.
If our vision moves you, please find it in your heart to support us as he move towards accomplishing a mammoth goal. Every little bit helps. At least you know with this charity all the money is going to the animals, and not to a big marketing budget.
Thanks for caring, and god bless!
DrQ


Teaching Oliver to side pass.
A nice video of him working well.
Working well on the rail.
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Read a Previous Update
Mary Lukowski
18 months ago

Please donations are needed to rescue these gorgeous horses. To rescue,and rehabilitate them. Cause remember they are rounded up for slaughter. Many are in bad shape. Many are not. A couple a thousand dollars each remember they have to pay for them. Then travel and feed these beauties. Please help we have a rescue horse. Surprised to find out he is a thorough bred and great great grandson of Secretariat. Amazing horse

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Naman Nassar
20 months ago

Hi, could you please post pictures of how things are going and of the animals. Thank you

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Jena Questen
23 months ago

Thank you to all our supporters! :)

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$1,590 of $7.0M goal

Raised by 30 people in 28 months
Created January 12, 2016
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$20
Jeff Skelton
16 months ago
1
1

Every bit helps! :-)

$100
Anonymous
17 months ago
1
1
$200
Jeff Urich
19 months ago
1
1

Horses need blankets!

$25
Fatima Hooshiarnejad
22 months ago

continue your good work

Mary Lukowski
18 months ago

Please donations are needed to rescue these gorgeous horses. To rescue,and rehabilitate them. Cause remember they are rounded up for slaughter. Many are in bad shape. Many are not. A couple a thousand dollars each remember they have to pay for them. Then travel and feed these beauties. Please help we have a rescue horse. Surprised to find out he is a thorough bred and great great grandson of Secretariat. Amazing horse

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Naman Nassar
20 months ago

Hi, could you please post pictures of how things are going and of the animals. Thank you

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Jena Questen
23 months ago

Thank you to all our supporters! :)

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