Woodridge Park Inclusive Playground

$5,568 of $150k goal

Raised by 36 people in 11 months
Molly Root Pietruszewski  COTTAGE GROVE, MN
The community of Cottage Grove, led by the Inclusive Playground Task Force, is attempting to build what is believed to the be the largest and most inclusive playground in the state of Minnesota at Woodridge Park in Cottage Grove.  When complete, it will be a gathering place where generations of memories are made through the simple act of PLAY.

The playground will include ramps to the tallest part of the play structure for those with mobility devices, safety swings for the youngest or weakest of individuals and a zipline that will challenge the most athletic of kids and adults.  No matter your physical, mental or social status, the inclusive playground will bring the community and visitors together to feel the joy of PLAY at Woodridge Park.   

The total cost for the project including six zones of playground equipment, three sensory gardens, ten swings, three accessible cruisers, sand and water play area, music play area, and 23, 000 sq ft of accessible surface will cost about $800,000.   The City of Cottage Grove contributed the first $350,000 towards the project.  The task force is asking for donations and submitting grants for the balance.

Please contact us if you have fundraising ideas, would like more information, or for the task force to make a presentation to your organization/business.
 
For more information and educational videos on the playground, please visit http://www.cottage-grove.org/cottage-grove-parks/local-parks/inclusive-playground.
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Update 1
Posted by Molly Pietruszewski
11 months ago
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The task force along with South Washington County Telecommunications Commission produced a video to explain a little more about "why" we need a playground like this in Cottage Grove. Enjoy...
Inclusive Play Video
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Reeve Brenner
15 days ago

Testimony Larry My name is Larry R. and I’m an accountant blessed with two children, two sons who are autistic, or more properly, on different stages of the autistic spectrum. The two boys love to play ball as do their parents with them. But when I take the family to a park it nearly breaks our hearts. At every one of these parks, you can see at once that there are plenty of ballplaying facilities for typical children. The average youngster or teen can wait in line to play tennis, basketball, soccer and the rest. But these are all team sports with opponents. They are not independent or individualized sports so that my boys can drop-in and participate along with everyone else in the community. This is understood as mainstreaming which does not exist apart from programs which further segregated and segment differently able populations. Why do all the typical kids get ballplaying facilities so much so that many of them are empty like the tennis courts being built for fewer and fewer participants. The point is there are many drop-in facilities: sports courts and sports fields for everyone but not for kids who are physically and cognitively challenged or mobility impaired or in wheelchairs or have other disabilities. They too should have drop-in ball playing sports to drop in with their family to play together and interact with others. There are none. What’s the point of a ramp leading to discrimination and exclusion which characterizes the new parks designed with little thought to including the differently-able. They are neglected willfully by a kind of callous indifference on the part of the authorities. It’s very sad and I speak not only for my own family. I’m certain i speak also for many of our county’s differently able children and adults who would also like to play ball at a facility but not with opponents, and not with teams, “a sport that does not require offense and defense but actively move their bodies, and are presented with sports challenges that they can succeed at, that socialize and mainstream’s all populations. We need to be giving consideration to diversity and the integration of special populations into a community activity. These parks offer accessibility when they should be offering inclusion.” {THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR RECREATIONAL EQUALITY website}. The only glimmer of hope is that of the Bankshot court we played at in several parks that brings a community together and includes the differently able. I wish officialdom would visit a court to experience walk-on, drop-in, inclusion. Why so few of these and others like it? There ought to be many such affordances in the community addressing the needs of the total community rather than merely the jocks and athletes. All families blessed with all kinds of children should have drop-in facilities to play ball just like other typical children and not always aggressive and having to defeat rivals but by playing alongside one another, not against one another, where, as I heard said, “you don’t have to win to be a winner,” [NARE] Rather, it is participation alongside others in mainstreaming disabled that brings a community together. There are many of us who would like to see attention paid to those who are so underserved in our parks. The parks from the perspective of my family and many others are sadly disappointing.

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Reeve Brenner
15 days ago

Cajun fast track family entertainment center would do well to consider bankshot family sports especially bankshot basketball for families and in particular families with differently able children who should also like to participate in a ballplaying inclusive facility with all other children able-bodied and otherwise. Look in at bankshot.com and nareletsplayfair.org for further information about this family attraction which teaches inclusion and diversity while providing a great deal of fun and challenge for families that are typical and atypical who would like to move their bodies but without aggression or body contact. Check out the Children's Museum of Memphis for their Bankshot Playcourt which is the latest and largest in the country as well as their posting on disabilities. It would be a good thing to add Bankshot for its diversity and inclusion in Woodridge park and would fit very well along with the other attractions offered. Dr. Reeve Brenner

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SaSha Kayleen Bowen
8 months ago

Bless you for doing this. I read about a mom who worked for over 10 years in Woodbury to have an accessible park after her own child was often to weak to join at the park but only watch siblings enjoy. I think this is amazing. Thank you.

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$5,568 of $150k goal

Raised by 36 people in 11 months
Created April 4, 2016
Molly Root Pietruszewski  
GW
$100
Gary & Sue Wege
18 days ago
SF
$1,000
Schwichtenberg Family
2 months ago
$25
Eric Short
3 months ago
JO
$100
justin olsen
3 months ago

I am making this donation in honor of my City Council colleagues. $25 each in the names of Steve Dennis, Dave Thiede, Jen Peterson, and Myron Bailey. Merry Chrsitmas!

MU
$50
Michael Utell
4 months ago
CL
$200
Cheryl Lindgren
4 months ago
JL
$100
Jana Lelm
5 months ago
AM
$100
Amber McLeod
6 months ago
MW
$50
Matt & Alyssa Wolf
6 months ago
AR
$10
Alex Ritchie
6 months ago
Reeve Brenner
15 days ago

Testimony Larry My name is Larry R. and I’m an accountant blessed with two children, two sons who are autistic, or more properly, on different stages of the autistic spectrum. The two boys love to play ball as do their parents with them. But when I take the family to a park it nearly breaks our hearts. At every one of these parks, you can see at once that there are plenty of ballplaying facilities for typical children. The average youngster or teen can wait in line to play tennis, basketball, soccer and the rest. But these are all team sports with opponents. They are not independent or individualized sports so that my boys can drop-in and participate along with everyone else in the community. This is understood as mainstreaming which does not exist apart from programs which further segregated and segment differently able populations. Why do all the typical kids get ballplaying facilities so much so that many of them are empty like the tennis courts being built for fewer and fewer participants. The point is there are many drop-in facilities: sports courts and sports fields for everyone but not for kids who are physically and cognitively challenged or mobility impaired or in wheelchairs or have other disabilities. They too should have drop-in ball playing sports to drop in with their family to play together and interact with others. There are none. What’s the point of a ramp leading to discrimination and exclusion which characterizes the new parks designed with little thought to including the differently-able. They are neglected willfully by a kind of callous indifference on the part of the authorities. It’s very sad and I speak not only for my own family. I’m certain i speak also for many of our county’s differently able children and adults who would also like to play ball at a facility but not with opponents, and not with teams, “a sport that does not require offense and defense but actively move their bodies, and are presented with sports challenges that they can succeed at, that socialize and mainstream’s all populations. We need to be giving consideration to diversity and the integration of special populations into a community activity. These parks offer accessibility when they should be offering inclusion.” {THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR RECREATIONAL EQUALITY website}. The only glimmer of hope is that of the Bankshot court we played at in several parks that brings a community together and includes the differently able. I wish officialdom would visit a court to experience walk-on, drop-in, inclusion. Why so few of these and others like it? There ought to be many such affordances in the community addressing the needs of the total community rather than merely the jocks and athletes. All families blessed with all kinds of children should have drop-in facilities to play ball just like other typical children and not always aggressive and having to defeat rivals but by playing alongside one another, not against one another, where, as I heard said, “you don’t have to win to be a winner,” [NARE] Rather, it is participation alongside others in mainstreaming disabled that brings a community together. There are many of us who would like to see attention paid to those who are so underserved in our parks. The parks from the perspective of my family and many others are sadly disappointing.

+ Read More
Reeve Brenner
15 days ago

Cajun fast track family entertainment center would do well to consider bankshot family sports especially bankshot basketball for families and in particular families with differently able children who should also like to participate in a ballplaying inclusive facility with all other children able-bodied and otherwise. Look in at bankshot.com and nareletsplayfair.org for further information about this family attraction which teaches inclusion and diversity while providing a great deal of fun and challenge for families that are typical and atypical who would like to move their bodies but without aggression or body contact. Check out the Children's Museum of Memphis for their Bankshot Playcourt which is the latest and largest in the country as well as their posting on disabilities. It would be a good thing to add Bankshot for its diversity and inclusion in Woodridge park and would fit very well along with the other attractions offered. Dr. Reeve Brenner

+ Read More
SaSha Kayleen Bowen
8 months ago

Bless you for doing this. I read about a mom who worked for over 10 years in Woodbury to have an accessible park after her own child was often to weak to join at the park but only watch siblings enjoy. I think this is amazing. Thank you.

+ Read More
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