Beth And Trenton’s Newlywed Fund

$5 of $5,000 goal

Raised by 1 person in 5 months
My name is Beth Taurasi. I was born in Orlando, September 20, 1986. To put it briefly, my parents emotionally and verbally abused me as a teenager, forced me to attend private school, and generally did not invest in a blind person in their family. Since I can remember, I’ve always loved music. Music was to me a healing thing, and I’ve spent many years at my piano practicing. I also did some service work with the National Junior Honors Society. High school was rough, however, because I never got a date and attended prom, and was frequently surrounded with patriarchy and rules that did not benefit independence for blind people. I was frequently called bossy and dismissed from groups, social gatherings, and clubs. In college, where I was studying to be a choral music ed instructor, I frequently came across barriers to my access to books, tools and tests that would have given me a teacher’s license and certification. I would have stayed in Florida had it not been for the events that took place in May 2010. A friend recommended NFB (National Federation of the Blind) training, and by this time, my family maintained guardianship due to blindness, although not full guardianship. They still wanted control of me and any man I dated, therefore I was forbidden from dating altogether. My first boyfriend and all the other relationships that followed failed miserably not due to blindness or me necessarily, but due to the desires of the men I dated not lining up with the fact that my parents had control of my marriage. My parents even made a laughing stock of one ex of mine, and pressured all my boyfriends to follow strict rules, etc. Instead of dating a white Catholic sighted man, I left Florida and came to Denver and eventually relocated there in 2011. Six years later, after what seemed like the billionth time a man did not want to go out with me, I found someone who was willing to love me for who I was.
Trenton Matthews, born December 17, 1984 in Denver, met me sometime in February 2016. I remember we were at Chili’s, and we hit it off so well, it must’ve driven his mother crazy. Trenton grew up in various states of poverty, his mother having different or no jobs, and at one point, slept on the floor of a studio apartment because his mother had no way to afford a better place. She now owns a condo unit of her own and has a good jjob, God bless her. We eventually moved in together, but this brought on consequences from a church I attended, so I abandoned religion. I was not happy with one of the church’s pastors stating that our relationship didn’t last long or wouldn’t last long. He even shamed me for having sex outside marriage, but what gives!
We came to the conclusion that after two years, maybe we could get married, but when the church booted me out, we never set foot there again. Trenton proposed to me, unfortunately not in the most romantic way, in my apartment. I said yes, but with no money to buy proper bands, people might not call it a proper engagement.
I am beginning to see how awful disability and marriage really are when placed hand in hand. Trenton said he wanted a small ceremony. I finally agreed to this recently. A dear friend, a revolutionary from Arizona, recommended us for a possible free catering at Panerra Bread, but as with other luck of the draw sweepstakes games, I have to count the stars and hope to win it. As a blind couple, we receive little money and support from family, and we have NO church memberships. Trenton and I have a 70% likelihood of not being employed, so we set up a legal shield business to cover costs after our wedding should we make sales. Today, I sing in a choir that gives back to foster youth in the Denver area. Soar Youth and Adult choir has opened a lot of doors for me, including the chance to sing under a wonderful choir director. I have also made amazing connections with both kids and adults, but the kids have inspired me to keep going and singing. I also want to add that if we exceed our goal by any amount, we will donate two portions of it to the Ayaan Hirsi Ali Foundation, a nonprofit that helps women and girls escape forced coerced marriage, and the Soar Youth and Adult Choir since hearing about them and singing with them has made a difference in my life. I keep a blog at the following websites, and I also do covers of songs just for the sake of keeping up with songs. I enjoy singing, and Trenton is a drummer. Donating to this fund will help us have the wedding we desire, and the money will be spent on the following items: a wedding dress for the bride, flowers to match our theme, wedding desserts and favors, wedding catering (that is if we don’t win the sweepstakes), photo ops, Trenton’s suit, a DJ or band for the reception, fees for the venue, and the rest will go towards our honeymoon. We have two places picked out but we strongly detest going to the mountains because of food security and accessibility of the spots for people with disabilities such as blindness. Trenton and I would also ask that anyone who donates to us in excess of our goal of $5000 consider checking out the charities we chose. Many blind and physically handicapped individuals are married without consent from the parties themselves, or they are married without knowing the financial consequences, or can’t marry because of family support being cut. Trenton only gets one Christmas greeting from my family a year, and expresses no desire to speak with them. I am frequently told they want what is best, but the family said they would never pay for my wedding as is tradition. We would have loved to visit Ireland on our honeymoon, but out of country visits could pose a disability rights risk, and because Trenton is not pale white, it could bring unwanted attention. We hope to be able to pay for our wedding, but we’re only allowed to make a certain amount below what weddings actually cost. As SSI recipients, we only have $2000 allowed in the bank itself. We plan to spend this money as wisely as we can, and maybe with hope and prayers, we will have a decent marriage threefold. Thank you for your time and consideration.
Visit me on the web at www.denverqueen.com, and check out my wedding page at wedding.denverqueen.com.
Check out Trenton and his website at www.trentonmatthews.com. He s a great web designer. Thank you all in advance.
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I’d like to update you all on the progress of the campaign and the mission behind it. First and foremost, statistics. 70% of blind people are unemployed, and after talking to friends about the likelihood of having a traditional job, I want to just say it would not be right to ask me to get one. Women are often paid less than a man, and the men I’ve seen at work get paid more positive attention. Few blind men work that I know if, and I also know of many who’ve filled out more than an average of 30 job applications a day and still didn’t get the telephone call saying they would be considered for a job interview. I want to show Trenton’s family how much they mean to me, and one way I’m doing this is by not shouldering them with the possible burden of financing a wedding. We were also lied to by a homeless guy who worked constrution, no name given, about this subject. My family refuses to think about my happiness and has put no value on me because of disability and the race of the groom to be. Please share and if possible, donate. Thank you.
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I just got word from someone who said, “Ain’t nobody’s gonna fund your wedding.” What does this person know? She knows nothing! I won’t name the lady who said this, but this is why we need donations. We need your generous donations because of people who don’t care about blind couples without family blessings. We want a memorable event, and we’re not asking as much. $5000 is not as hard to attain as $5,000,000. Please, think about it. If you’re really on disability, share it with someone who could donate. IF you’re a orporation, share it with your supervisors or coworkers. I want to overcome what’s stacked against u, and people like the one I quoted are against us. This does not show genuine caring or respect for others. Share the donate page and if possible, donate.
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I would like to thank the following people for their efforts in boosting the number of shares: this is gonna sound weird, but I’d like to thank the trance DJ Ferry Corsten, a proud Dutchman and to me, the god of trance, for distributing this campaign. I’d also like to thank hip hop artist Esoteric Quality for distributing this link to people, even with him being broke. Hugs to both of you all for being behind me and Trenton every step of the way. Also, my good friend Ulysses Garcia, even though the donation was a small one, every small donation counts toward expenses not covered by our pockets. Please encourage your friends, family, and neighbors to read the story behind this campaign and if possible, donate. I’m considering some Dutch imports of tulips as a way to thank Mr. Corsten for his time and consideration and patience and outright generosity. Thanks again, fans and friends, and keep spreading the word.
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Okay, thanks to Clayton, I revamped the story on this page. Check this out.
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$5 of $5,000 goal

Raised by 1 person in 5 months
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